Don’t be fooled by the sporty lines of the Prestige 630 S—she’s built to cruise as well as any motoryacht
Prestige 630S

When you see this boat tied up stern-to, the salon looks cavernous and the effect is multiplied as you step inside. It must be the headroom, since even the step up from the galley area aft to the seating area, with a huge L-shaped settee and easy chair to port and a large loveseat to starboard feel very roomy—windows expand the space nicely. Neutral-colored fabrics and carpet help create a relaxing environment. One thing I noticed, the high-gloss finish is back. The rich luster of dark wood varnished to a high shine adds a special something to the interior that we’ve been missing as matte finishes have taken over. This space is all the brighter for the enormous sunroof that opens over the forward end of the salon. It’s a terrific addition that lets the main deck really give any flying bridge a run for its money.

Prestige 630S

Prestige has been really inventive lately in putting more and more usable space in its layouts and the 630 S is no exception, with a three-stateroom layout. The amidships master spans the full beam and has its own entry companionway opposite the galley, giving a sense of solitude that I am accustomed to seeing on larger yachts. It’s a game changer. There’s a lounge to port and a dressing table to starboard. The head compartment is forward.

The additional accommodations consist of a VIP in the bow and a double to port. Both are finished to the same level as the master, with a delightful feel, owing largely to the headroom. The head of the VIP berth has 33½ inches of clearance, while the VIP head has a skylight in its 6-foot, 9-inch overhead.

Prestige 630S

Prestige takes its understanding of how people fit in spaces and translates it to the engine room as well. Varying overhead heights range from 5 feet 11 inches to 6 feet 4 inches and the Volvo Penta D11 diesels, linked to IPS2-C pods, are positioned 24 inches apart. The pod drives are jackshafted so they are positioned beneath the forward of the two berths in the crew’s quarters aft. This design lets the builder make the most of the IPS system, while still maintaining its design parameters for center of gravity.

The attention to detail shows: The 630 S is ready to run and tracks well, though maintaining her heading was easy in the very favorable conditions we saw. I drove her from that flybridge, where the portside helm has a racy little wheel and helm and companion seats, plus additional seating at an aft lounge with table. I put her through some sweeping turns, and she dropped her shoulder into the turns and her hull gripped the water. 

The Test

Test Conditions: Air temperature: 72 F; humidity: 92%; seas: 2-3’.
Load: 190 gal. fuel; 175 gal. water, four persons.

Prestige 630 S — Final Boat Test Numbers:

RPMKNOTSGPHRANGEdB(A)

1000

8.9

8.3

572

67

1250

10.6

15.0

377

70

1500

11.5

22.0

279

71

1750

15.3

33.6

243

72

2000

19.8

43.3

244

74

2250

24.1

56.1

229

76

2500

28.6

70.2

217

77

2560

29.4

72.0

218

79

Speeds are measured in two directions with Raymarine GPS. GPH is recorded from Volvo Penta engine-monitoring system. Sound levels are measured at the lower helm. 65 dB(A) is the level of normal conversation.

Specifications:

LOA: 62’5”
Beam: 16’11”
Draft: 4’11”
Displ.: 72,752 lb. (full load)
Fuel: 593 gal.
Water: 175 gal.
Power: 2/725-hp Volvo Penta IPS 950
Transmission: Volvo Penta IPS, 1.70:1 gear ratio
Propellers: Volvo Penta P3 propset
Generator: 21-kilowatt Fischer Panda

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This article originally appeared in the April 2018 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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