Regal 38 SAV

The new 38 center helm design meets the needs of anglers and overnight cruisers alike.

Regal 38 SAV

Regal 38 SAV

Regal installed a combination livewell/wine chiller on the new 38 SAV. That piece of equipment alone tells the story of what the 50-year-old builder is seeking to accomplish with this boat: A perfect mix of cruising attributes in a very fishable, open design.

When Regal introduced its 33 SAV (Sports Activity Vessel) a couple years ago, it attempted to combine the wants and needs of cruising families looking for a comfortable overnighter that they could wet a line on from now and then. The 33 has plenty of seating and a good-sized cuddy, and yes, you can fish from it, but it isn’t all that fishy. The new 38 SAV expands on the concept, offering more standard features that adhere to advanced anglers while not forgetting about the family that may want to spend a weekend on board.

Center consoles in the 35- to 40-foot range typically offer plenty of outboard power to race out to the rip, a ridiculous number of rod holders, massive fish coffins and copious room up front to battle fish, but little in the way of accommodations. Most of these platforms have a small head inside the console and a berth that quickly becomes overcrowded with fishing tackle. The 38 SAV is a complete departure.

Upon walking onto the 38 SAV, it feels much larger than a 38-footer. The deck is laid out to maximize space, with no obstacles that could result in busted toes or traffic jams. The swim step wraps around both sides of the triple outboards, making it easy to get in and out of the boat. This bit of extra standing room will also come in handy when trying to clear the engines with a hot fish on the line. Two doors on either side of the transom and dual side-entry doors make boarding easy, whether it’s a guest stepping in from a dock or a big fish being plucked from the sea.

The company calls the 38 SAV a center helm design; it’s not a full walkaround center console. The port side offers a wide walkway and a set of teak steps on the starboard side provides access to the bow—or easy egress to high quays—when docking or anchoring. Four helm chairs are not just for sitting. The outward chairs swing around so you can watch the lures behind the boat, and all four seats fold flat for additional counter space when grilling out on the entertainment counter just behind the captain’s chairs. With additional seating in the bow, behind the entertainment center and along the transom, you can carry 15 passengers without stepping on each others’ flip-flops.

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As for fishing features, the hardtop comes with reinforced mounts for outriggers, there’s a row of rod holders on the transom, dual insulated lockers and a pair of 16-inch Garmin displays at the helm. If you’re the type of person who would never consider buying a house that didn’t have a garage, you’ll love the 38’s lazarette. The hydraulic-powered deck lifts up to reveal the standard Seakeeper, all of your batteries and switches, the genset and enough storage space for gearheads who can’t resist the latest watertoy or fishing accoutrement.

Down below, you see the Regal touch everywhere. With large windws for natural light, you never feel cramped in this comfy living space. A queen-sized berth up front and a convertible mid-cabin settee in the air-conditioned cabin make it the perfect escape from the heat. The full head with separate walk-in shower is something you don’t often find on board an open boat of this size.

Regal 38 SAV

Regal 38 SAV

The 38 SAV runs strong with triple 300-hp Yamaha outboards and the company’s patented FasTrac hull design. She’ll hit a top end of 45-plus knots.

Regal, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, continues to grow by building quality boats and listening to the demands of their customers. The 38 SAV is testament to that recipe for success.

Regal 38 SAV Specifications:

LOA: 38'10"
Beam: 11'11"
Displ.: 18,000 lbs.
Fuel: 350 gal.
Water: 66 gal.
Top Speed: 45 knots
Standard power: 3/300-hp Yamaha F300 outboards
Price: $688,000

This article originally appeared in the January 2020 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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