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by Capt. Richard Thiel

PMY Editor-in-Chief:
Raised in San Diego, Richard grew up on boats—admittedly, mostly sailboats. He actually didn't purchase his first powerboat, a 19-foot SeaCraft center console, until after he moved to Jupiter, Florida, in 1980. From the moment he launched Last Resort, he was hooked on powerboats, so much so that he decided to parlay his love of them and his experience as a diesel mechanic into a career as a freelance boating writer. Read more here...

No Show

By Capt. Richard Thiel | Posted April 2007 | Add a Comment

Everyone loves a boat show. And why wouldn't they? There are beautiful boats, lots of different foods, entertainment, and usually sunshine. And compared to an Orlando attraction, the cost is reasonable. No wonder boat shows are such a popular family outing.The Newport Harbor Hotel and Marina, site of The Yacht Collection at

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A Fuel For You

By Capt. Richard Thielphotos by Erik Rank | Posted March 2007 | Add a Comment

There are plenty of reasons why the diesel engine is the best power choice for boats over 35 feet, and principal among them is its sterling reliability and reknowned durability. Compared with even the newest electronic gasoline engines, diesels are signifitcantly less likely to suddenly stop running and significantly more likely to outlive their owners.But diesels aren’t perfect. They do

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The Gathering Storm

By Capt. Richard Thiel | Posted March 2007 | Add a Comment

Simone TieberAny mariner worthy of the name knows that when you spot threatening clouds on the horizon, you don’t just sit there. You act, or at least you start formulating a plan to deal with the looming threat. Only an irresponsible boater would gamble that the storm will somehow magically turn away. So why is everyone from

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An Affair of the Heart

By Capt. Richard Thiel | Posted March 2007 | Add a Comment

It’s my firm belief that owning a yacht is like having a love affair: There’s no room for logic. The entire process (from picking one out to staffing it to using it) should come from the heart, not from the brain. And as far as budget goes—well, you wouldn’t go shopping for an engagement ring at Wal-Mart, would you?Ryan

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Birthday Bash

By Capt. Richard ThielPhotos by Anna ... | Posted January 2007 | Add a Comment

It all began with an e-mail: “Come to Amsterdam and wish Rembrandt a Happy 400th birthday.” It seems Crown Blue Line (CBL) was promoting its charter boats in Holland. I’d no idea you could bareboat in Holland, yet discovered the company has two bases there—one in Strand Horst, 35 miles east of Amsterdam, and the other in Sneek, about 60 miles north of Strand

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Duetto

By Capt. Richard Thiel | Posted October 2006 | Add a Comment

While it may not seem so to us, the American yacht buyer is a tough nut to crack. In fact, you could say the American market has, over the years, proven to be something of a tar pit for foreign builders; the bones of the unsuccessful ones litter the landscape. The problem is that Americans love boats from foreign shores, but only on their terms, and those terms often involve things like

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Mainship 43

By Capt. Richard Thiel | Posted March 2006 | Add a Comment

Next time you’re hanging at the ol’ waterfront watering hole and feel like stirring things up, drop this on your buddies: “Power & Motoryacht just tested a 43-foot trawler that did 27 mph.” At least one guy will look up from his brew and declare that no trawler could possibly go that fast because, as everyone knows, trawlers are displacement boats limited to hull speed, which for a 43 is

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Man Power

By Capt. Richard Thiel | Posted October 2004 | Add a Comment

You can’t help but conclude that yacht building is tailor-made for the Chinese.

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Rayburn 88

By Capt. Richard Thielphotos by Rober... | Posted December 2003 | Add a Comment

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Better People for Better Boats

By Capt. Richard Thiel | Posted July 2003 | Add a Comment

The smartest companies treat boatbuilding like a trade.

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