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Megayachts

The World's 100 Largest Yachts 2001

World’s 100 Largest Yachts
World’s 100 Largest Yachts — August 2001
Sixteen years and counting—our annual tribute to the biggest beauties afloat.

By Diane M. Byrne
   
 


 More of this Feature
• Top 100: Part 1
• 1-8
• 9-17
• 18-26
• 27-35
• 36-44
• 45-53
• 54-62
• 63-71
• 72-80
• 81-89
• 90-100
• Yacht Spotter

 Related Resources
• Megayacht Feature Index

Landmarks. Whether they're centuries-old structures, famous buildings, or even the broad, bold skyline of an entire city, landmarks add excitement and variety to the landscape.

The same holds true for megayachts--especially the world's largest yachts, which we have been tracking for the past 16 years. Some have unmistakable profiles, featuring colorful hulls, funnels, or "wings" that let you pick them out even when they're off on the horizon. Others have been around long enough and dock in the same place year after year to be nearly part of their marina's and surrounding city's architecture.

More comparisons can be drawn between land-based landmarks and the world's largest yachts. For instance:

· The London Eye, the huge Ferris wheel erected on the bank of the Thames for the millennium celebration, stands about 443 feet tall. If you balanced Savarona on her transom and included her bowsprit in her overall length, she'd be about the same height.

· The Sagrada Familia, Antonio Gandi's famous unfinished masterpiece in Barcelona, has 12 bell towers, several of which rise about 328 feet into the sky. The first eight yachts on our list exceed that length.

· One of the most famous structures in the New York City skyline, the Empire State Building, stands 1,454 feet tall (1,453 feet, 89/16 inches, to be exact). The total length of yachts on order with Lürssen in Germany for American clients alone exceeds the height of the landmark.

Without further ado, here are "The World's 100 Largest Yachts." Note that for several years now, we've restricted the list to yachts not maintained for heads of state. (After all, it's more astounding to realize an individual spent $50-million-plus of his own money to build or restore a yacht.) All construction information uses the following code: L=length; Y=year launched (if two dates are given, the second is a refit that involved significant structural changes); B=builder, N=naval architect, H=hull material, and E=engines. New launches are highlighted in blue.

Next page > Top 100: 1-8 > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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