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The World’s 100 Largest Yachts 2003 Page 4

The World’s 100 Largest Yachts - 2003

By Diane M. Byrne

   

Lone Ranger (#24)
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20. CONSTELLATION • L: 262'4"; Y: 1999
Twenty-two crew members keep the 23-knot Constellation going. Little is known about the yacht, other than that the owner is Middle Eastern.
B: Oceanco, South Africa; N: The “A” Group; H: Steel; E: 2/8,160-hp MTUs

21. STARGATE • L: 262'4"; Y: 2001
The Middle Eastern owner of Stargate has prohibited any interior photography from being taken, so there’s unfortunately little we can tell you about the yacht, other than the fact that she was built simultaneously with her sistership, Constellation (see no. 20).
B: Oceanco, South Africa; N: The “A” Group; H: Steel; E: 2/8,160-hp MTUs

22. DELPHINE • L: 257'8"; Y: 1921/2003
Beginning next month Delphine should be available for charter in the Med, after finally completing a major refit in Belgium. We say “finally” because a handful of previous owners intended to restore her but never did. She’s been returned to her Roaring Twenties glory, including the full operation of her steam engines, thanks to a Belgian textiles magnate. A Turkish bath and sauna as well as about 10,000 square feet of open deck space are at the disposal of upwards of 26 guests. Thirteen staterooms accommodate guests, with two of the rooms reserved as VIPs and two others reserved for children and/or babysitters. Delphine was originally launched for American Horace Dodge (of the famous Dodge automobile family) and named for his daughter. A book chronicling the yacht’s history and restoration is in the works.
B: Great Lakes Engineering Works, USA; N: Henry J. Gielow; H: Steel; E: 2/750-hp Babcoq & Wilcox steam engines

23. MONTKAJ • L: 256'0"; Y: 1995
Prince Mohamad, son of Saudi Arabia’s King Fahd and a former minister of communications for the country, keeps Montkaj at his private jetty in Cannes. He’s never permitted photos to be taken of the interior or for information to be released to the media, but we’ve found out a few things nonetheless. For example, we’ve long known that his suite spreads over two decks, and there’s a huge tender stowage bay on the foredeck, not in the transom or in the hull sides, as is the tradition for many mega-size megayachts. The yacht’s size and lines are made even more striking at night by an intricate lighting system. It’s comprised of fiber optics and accent lights installed in her mast and the rest of her superstructure as well as underwater lights at her transom.
B: Amels, Holland; N: Terence Disdale; H: Steel; E: 2/2,500-hp Caterpillars

24. LONE RANGER • L: 255'0"; Y: 1973/1994
You have to hand it to Peter Lewis, the CEO of car-insurance company Progressive and owner of Lone Ranger. He definitely knows how to relax and enjoy his yacht, a converted salvage tug. There’s a gym for when he feels like working out, scuba equipment for when he feels like checking out the undersea life, a 31-foot trimaran and a 38-foot powerboat for zipping around harbors, and a pool for when he feels like swimming in fresh water. Two chefs among the 18-member crew cater to his culinary desires as well as those of friends like former U.S. Senator Bob Kerrey and famous architect Frank Gehry. He’s owned Lone Ranger for six years.
B: Schichau-Unterwesser, Germany; N: Claus Kusch (conversion); H: Steel; E: 2/4,400-hp Deutz-MWMs

25. LADY SARYA • L: 250'4"; Y: 1972
If you happen to be in the Med while Lady Sarya embarks on one of her all-too-infrequent cruises, you’ll recognize her due to side-by-side, narrow (and unsightly) funnels aft. Movie buffs may remember seeing her (then named La Belle Simone) hosting a fabulous party and cruising around in the 1970’s film The Greek Tycoon.
B: Cantiere Navale Apuania, Italy; N: Rinaldo Gastaldi; H: Steel; E: 2/3,340-hp MTUs

26. TALITHA G • L: 247'4"; Y: 1929/1994
In April Talitha G’s owner, 70-year-old J. Paul Getty, Jr., died. The American expat, heir to the famous Getty Oil fortune, became a British citizen in 1998 and was made a full Knight shortly thereafter. At presstime there was no word on whether his estate would sell the yacht. Whatever happens, Talitha G had a wonderful run under Getty’s ownership. Since the mid-1990’s he’d been allowing celebrities like Tom Cruise, close friends, and British royalty and political figures to vacation aboard. For example, when the royal yacht Britannia was taken out of service in 1997, he let the sovereigns observe the famous Cowes Week sailing regatta from Talitha G’s decks a few years in a row. His actions spoke just as loudly as his words—Getty was once quoted as saying, “Money is like manure, it’s most effective when it’s spread around widely.”
B: Krupps Kiel, Germany; N: Cox & Stevens; H: Steel; E: 2/1,400-hp Caterpillars

27. LEANDER • L: 245'3"; Y: 1992
For the past few years, Leander has been the most expensive charter yacht in the world. But with the launch of Annaliesse (see no. 17), she’s now just one of the most expensive. Sigh. The good news is, given the reputation she’s earned for herself over the past 11 years on the charter market, Leander is arguably one of the finest to vacation aboard. Notables like the late Gianni Agnelli of Fiat and über-gossip Taki have enjoyed her sumptuous spaces. The owner’s suite, for example, contains two suites as well as a saloon and a private deck—talk about living in the lap of luxury. And no one can ever complain of having nothing to do, given the dozen or so watertoys to choose from, which include 18- and 20-foot RIB/landing crafts. Another reason Leander has such an outstanding reputation: her owner, Sir Donald Gosling of England. Gosling, who created the National Car Parks chain in his homeland, has long been high on the list of likeable yacht owners. One story had him telling girlfriends to take their parents along for cruises, since his own Mum was a frequent guest.
B: Peenewerft Shipyard, Germany; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/3,600-hp Deutz-MWMs

28. KATANA • L: 244'4"; Y: 1991
While Oracle Corporation chief Larry Ellison spent tens of millions on a team to compete in the America’s Cup race, only to have them lose in the semifinals, at least he got to drown his sorrows aboard this yacht, the largest in his motoryacht fleet (he also owns Ronin, no. 81). Ellison had Katana sent to New Zealand early last year and kept her there through this spring, allowing select individuals interested in buying her to come aboard for a look around. We say “select” because not everyone can afford to drop $68 million, the asking price. But no deals were struck, so the yacht took off for France, arriving in early May, where she’s still for sale. Some New Zealanders are breathing a sigh of relief that Ellison is gone, since apparently his braggadocio didn’t sit well with them. There was even a joke going around Auckland during the race preparations in which “Oracle” was an acronym for a rather, ahem, colorful description of Ellison, beginning with “One Rich” and ending with “Called Larry Ellison” (we’ll leave it up to you to fill in the blank).
B: Blohm & Voss, Germany; N: Martin Francis; H: Steel; E: 2/5,000-hp Deutz-MWMs with 1/18,500-hp GE turbine

29. SALEM • L: 241'0"; Y: 1998 (conversion)
A two-year process turned a weather ship into this yellow-hulled yacht. We’ve received conflicting reports of her owner’s nationality, some saying he’s European and others saying he’s a Saudi prince. Regardless, little is known about her, other than that she retains some of that commercial character.
B: Devonport Yachts, England (conversion); N: Devonport (conversion); H: Steel; E: unknown

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This article originally appeared in the July 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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