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Greta van Susteren's Trumpy Page 3

Isn’t She Lovely?

Saving Sequoia

By Eileen Mansfield - November 2003

   


 More of this Feature

• Part 1: S.S. Sophie
• Part 2: S.S. Sophie
• Saving Sequoia
• S.S. Sophie Photo Gallery


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• Feature Index

Sequoia, built in 1925, is probably the most famous Trumpy to have come down the ways of this venerable builder. Not only is she a piece of boatbuilding history, she’s also an important piece of American history. To quote Rear Admiral Robert C. Mandeville, “On the decks of this great vessel, wars were forged, treaties were negotiated, and the future of our nation secured.”

Over the course of 45 years, she served seven presidents, and many important events took place onboard. Some of these include President Johnson pitching Congressmen his “Great Society” program, part of which would eventually become Medicare; President Nixon meeting with Russian Premier Brezhnev in 1973 regarding arms control; and Jackie Kennedy hosting President Kennedy’s 46th (and final) birthday party.

Sequoia was taken out of Presidential service in 1977 and is privately owned by Gary Silversmith, a Washington, D.C., attorney. She is currently available for charters, but Silversmith hopes to make this famous Trumpy available to the general public.

Enter the USS Sequoia Preservation Trust, a nonprofit organization which, according to its mission statement, hopes to “acquire, restore, endow, preserve, exhibit, and operate” the historic yacht.

According to Bill Codus, chief of protocol for Sequoia and a trustee for the USS Sequoia Preservation Trust , the trust plans to make the vessel “available for the President and Congress. It will also be used for naval sea cadets and available for students to learn about the history of the boat.” Codus says that tours and briefings will be accessible to schools as well.

But for this to happen, the foundation needs to raise funds from government and private sources. For more information about this historic vessel and the foundation trying to save her, Phone: (202) 872-8228. —E.M.

Next page > Photo Gallery > Page 1, 2, 3, 4

This article originally appeared in the October 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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