PMY Tested

PMY Tested

Sea Eagle 10.6 SR

We put a Sea Eagle dinghy to the test! Older model Sea Eagle tenders had a less-than-stellar reputation in the industry. The company says they've doubled down on the boat's comfort and durability. Find out how it performed here.

How to Choose the Right Marine Binoculars

Knowing what you’re looking at has a key component: Being able to see enough detail to make the right decisions. Understand what marine binoculars have to offer, and think about a new pair—good ones don’t need to cost too much.

Sirius Signal Distress Light

Power & Motoryacht Tested: Pyrotechnic flares have been a Coast Guard  requirement for decades for one simple reason: they work. At night—and even during the daytime—light and smoke from a pyrotechnic are visible from miles away. But traditional flares have limitations.

Yeti Hopper 30

A warm sunny day on the water and cold beverages go together like, well, a sunny day on the water and cold beverages. That’s why us boaters—perhaps more than any other group—demand the most from our coolers.

Tested: Drybags for Boaters

A good drybag is a necessity on a boat. Whether you’re swimming in to the beach with your wallet and phone or just want to make extra-sure your new camera stays in working condition, a drybag is a must. We tried out a slew of them to see which is best. Here's what we found out.

Tested: Foul-Weather Gear

We rounded up a variety of foul-weather jackets from some well-known brands and tested them. 

When the wind picks up and the clouds get dark, it’s time to pull on the foulies. But not all foul-weather wear is created equal. We took five different jackets and put them through our own rigorous test to find out which is the best for you—better yet, we got it all on video. Read (and watch) more here.

AquaLens Underwater Viewing System

If a remote-controlled submarine’s too pricey for your budget, try a submersible on a stick.

For weeks, I’d been anticipating the arrival of an AquaLens (an underwater viewing system that mounts on an extendable boathook) from the folks at Aquabotix. While I have no trouble checking on the health of the transom zincs on my boat by simply lying prone on her swim platform and reaching underwater, checking the condition of the deeper, way-less-accessible propshaft zinc (as well as the prop itself) in wintertime North Florida is a chilly, virtually impossible task, unless you happen to own a wet suit and a scuba rig. So was a remote, waterproof video camera—a sort of miniature submarine on a stick—gonna be cool or what?