Subscribe to our newsletter

Boats

Horizon Powercat PC60 Skylounge

Horizon Powercat PC60 Skylounge

How many ways do you know to skin a cat? If you’re already a cat-fancier and have followed the growing market for powercats, you’ve witnessed the magical transformation from frumpy to fabulous—at least in the big ones. In addition to giving the owner a spacious interior, comfort in rough seas, and economical running, the newest cats look like boats—you know, like monohulls. The Horizon Powercat PC60 Skylounge is a fine example of this breed. 

Multihull expert Angelo Lavranos of New Zealand, who provided the naval architecture and engineering for Horizon’s PC58, derived the PC60 from that design. This additional length allows the company to offer ZF pod drives as an option to the standard straight-shaft running gear. The Winchester Design Group of Jupiter, Florida, wrapped the new boat in an elegant skin, which ought to attract customers who have objected to the old-fashioned bulky look of many production cats.

The PC60’s profile has a smoothly broken sheerline and swept-back superstructure that remind me of a sportfishing yacht. All of her curves and angles play very nicely with one another, especially the arcs at the transom, the after edges of the saloon and flying bridge, and the windows. From a forward quarter or head-on her superstructure is a bit flat across the front, but that really doesn’t matter. This visual cue is indicative of a master stateroom, on the main deck forward of the saloon, that is amazingly livable, plus this element disappears from consciousness after you become familiar with its benefits.

A lot of yachtsmen and women gravitate to catamarans because they have a tremendous amount of space inside on a given length—especially the common areas. They also offer their owners acres of play-space on deck. Want to throw a party for your slip-mates? Invite a dozen aboard the PC60 and you’ll still have room for more. Her saloon is only a few feet narrower than the yacht’s overall beam of 24 feet, 6 inches. A dining bar and four stools form the inner border of the starboard-side galley. The dinette opposite seats six to eight guests and on the afterdeck the dining table seats six, or more, and a bench against the transom has room for at least four more. Belowdecks, the starboard hull has a VIP guest cabin forward and a double just abaft amidships. Another double lives in the port hull, dead-nuts amidships, and shares its head with the opposite double.

Passagemaking yachtsmen will value her miserly fuel consumption and pleasant motion is big seas. The PC60’s symmetrical hulls have a fine entry and a flattened run. This combination slices through the waves and lets the additional buoyancy aft lift the yacht over what remains. Remember, catamarans don’t roll, so forget about active stabilizers and the drag that goes with them.

Click here for Horizon's contact information and index of articles ➤


Brokerage Listings Powered by BoatQuest.com
Click to see listings of Horizon Yachts currently for sale on BoatQuest.com. ➤

This article originally appeared in the May 2014 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

Related Features