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What's the Brokerage Market for the Sea Ray 390 Express Cruiser?

We spoke to three brokers who each had a Sea Ray 390 Express Cruiser listed on BoatQuest.com. Here’s what they each had to say about the model and its place in the market.

Sea Ray 390

Ken Ferguson, Neptune Yacht Sales; www.neptuneyachtsales.com ➤
“You don’t see that many of them, particularly the 39. You do see older boats of similar style that are in the 33- or 34-foot range. It is quite spacious down below. It has a very large usable cockpit, and a layout that’s good for entertaining, or as a dayboat. A lot of people shy away from the gas engines but if you take into account how boats are generally used, it’s relatively short distances, then either a quiet anchorage or dockage at an attraction for the day or weekend. So if you really break down how the boat is likely to be used, fuel consumption should not be the top issue or driver in the decision.”

Kevin McNally, SkipperBud’s; www.skipperbuds.com ➤
“Your average hours that go onto a boat in the Midwest are probably significantly lower. While the benefit of diesel is that you probably get 25 to 30 percent better on your fuel range, the downside is just the overall cost of them, so some people just bought gas and saved a lot of money and if they weren’t using them a lot it certainly made sense. The boat just has an awful lot of living space, not to mention it’s a very nice running boat. The older boats aren’t selling like they have in previous years, mainly because you’re limited on doing financing on anything that’s over ten years old. Not saying that you can’t, but it’s certainly limited options, the interest rates are higher, and the banks are a little tighter on what they’ll loan money on.”

Michael Speciale, All American Yacht Broker; www.allamericanyachtbrokers.com ➤
“It’s a fabulous boat. A potential buyer who looked at it yesterday was basically drooling over how nice a shape it’s in. But his comment was “Boy is this big … I don’t know if I can drive that.” This boat is 39 feet, and with the pulpit and swim platform, it comes out to 44 feet. People used to fall over each other for these boats, particularly because of the beam, and the construction. My boat in particular—the owner has taken it for an eight-week journey through the Bahamas each year, and he’s done this since 1999. So every year it goes for an eight-week cruise and he puts 600 nautical miles on it. He replaced the engines with 8.1-liter multi-port fuel-injected motors.”

Read our review of the Sea Ray 390 on BoatQuest.com here ➤


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