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BOATS

BOAT TESTS

Bruckmann Yachts Abaco 40

CONDITIONS DURING BOAT TEST

Air temperature: 80°F; humidity 80%; seas: calm

LOAD DURING BOAT TEST

60 gal. fuel, 75 gal. water, 3 persons, 100 lb. gear.

TEST BOAT SPECIFICATIONS

Test Engine: 1/670-mhp Cummins QSM11 diesel inboard

Transmission/Ratio: ZF325A, 1.49:1 ratio

Props: 25 x 26 5-blade ZF

Price as Tested: $850,000

The Numbers

Bruckmann Yachts Abaco 40 - Final Boat Test Numbers:
RPM KNOTS GPH RANGE dB(A)
600 6.1 1.2 1,372 67
1000 8.8 4.6 517 74
1250 10.9 8.4 350 74
1500 16.4 12.0 369 76
1750 19.0 19.7 260 79
2000 24.4 22.8 289 82
2350 27.7 33.7 222 85
Speeds are two-way averages measured w/ Furuno GPS sensor. GPH estimates taken via Cummins display. Range based on 90% of advertised fuel capacity.
Sound levels measured at the helm. 65 dB(A) is the level of normal conversation.

OPTIONAL EQUIPMENT ON TEST BOAT

Noteworthy Options: 6-kW Onan generator ($15,200)
upgrade to 670-mhp Cummins QSM11 diesel inboard ($8,500)
thruster upgrade to variable speed, both bow and stern ($13,270)
teak decking in cockpit ($8,200)
16,000-Btu Cruisair AC for pilothouse ($9,200)
2/8,000-Btu Cruisair AC for interior ($16,800).

On Location

Better Boat: Smooth Operator

Years ago Mark Ellis worked for C. Raymond Hunt Associates, the outfit that’s more closely identified with deep-V hulls than any other design firm. But once he’d hung out his own shingle, Ellis began looking for something a bit more cruiseworthy—a hullform that would boost lower-speed performance but maintain directional stability and cut the deep-V’s hefty horsepower demands. What he came up with was a running surface that features deep-V-like sections forward, sections amidships with a lesser V (and radiused apexes), and after sections with radically broad chineflats. The upshot, as we saw during our sea trial of the Abaco 40 (with 2-foot-wide chineflats), is a rough-water-capable vessel that planes flat at relatively low speeds due to stern lift. “This makes sense for cruising people,” says Ellis, “I mean it’s great to ram around in a runabout doing 22 knots all day but, if you’re cruising, you want to go slow sometimes. My chineflat boat will let you do that efficiently.”
Mark Ellis Design, 860-581-8370; www.markellisdesign.ca

This article originally appeared in the August 2013 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.