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Book Recommendations

booksBehind the Fiddle

For some of us winter has set in, the days are short, and we’re counting down the dark days till the yard calls with the good news that our boat is in the water and ready to go. If your case of cabin fever has become chronic, or if you’re looking to spend some time with a good read while tugging at the anchor in warmer climes, we’ve put together four picks that should be on your saloon’s bookshelf (all are available online).

On Board with Bradley 
By Dick Bradley 
The in-house curmudgeon and columnist for the now-defunct Motor Boating & Sailing magazine entertains the reader with this collection of columns revolving around his time onboard a Huckins. The book will leave you laughing in your saloon. It’s also full of good tips. One of the most useful: How to deposit the luggage of unwanted guests on the dock and hightail it out of there when they aren’t looking. Brilliant!

The Boat Who Wouldn’t Float
By Farley Mowat
This wonderful and gut-wrenching read recounts how Mowat searched for and purchased a long-in-the-tooth wooden sailboat and the adventures that followed from Newfoundland to Lake Ontario. Mowat’s storytelling is superb, and all boaters will identify with a few of his misadventures.

Yen for a Yacht
By Robert S. Woodbury
If you’ve ever thought about escaping to paradise, restoring a classic motor-yacht, and eking out a living taking on charter guests, you owe it to yourself to spend a weekend reading this nonfiction tale. You may just save a whole lot of money and heartache. 

The Voyage of Detroit
By Thomas Fleming Day
We have yachtsman Jay Ottinger to thank for republishing Thomas Fleming Day’s The Voyage of Detroit. Every boater should have a copy of this 125-page adventure chronicling Day’s epic 6,308-mile voyage from New York to St. Petersburg, Russia, in 1912. At the time Day was the editor of The Rudder and wanted to prove the reliability of the internal combustion engine by taking a 35-foot double-ended powerboat on a major ocean passage. Geez, this magazine’s editors have to go to South Florida to test a boat for a few hours. Hmm?

This article originally appeared in the February 2013 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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