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FYI: February 2002 Page 2

FYI - February 2002 continued
FYI — February 2002
By Brad Dunn
   
 
 More of this Feature
• Part 1: Weevil to the Rescue and more
• Part 2: Manhunt for a Boatbuilder, and more

 Related Resources
• News/FYI Index

 Elsewhere on the Web
• Cruisingguides.com
• Penchantpublishing.com
 

Manhunt on for Boatbuilder
The FBI is looking for an escaped murderer who be may working as a boatbuilder or woodworker and should be considered "armed and dangerous."

Philip Sadowski, who worked for boatbuilders in both Montana and Massachusetts before being jailed in 1989 for murder, has been on "America's Most Wanted" list since last March. In October the FBI asked the boating media to get the word out about Sadowski. At presstime, he remained at large.

Sadowski was sentenced to 40 years in prison after being convicted of murdering a man at a bar in Bozeman, Montana. While in prison, Sadowski wrote to several boatbuilders and offered his services as a designer, according to the FBI. The agency says there's a strong possibility that the fugitive is now working somewhere on the East Coast.

Sadowski, 66, is a white male with brown hair and brown eyes. He's 5'7" and weighs about 160 pounds. If you have any information that could lead to his arrest, contact the FBI at (406) 443-3617.

Fuel Cells Fueled
Marine fuel cells got a big shot in the arm in October. Cummins received a 10-year, $72-million development contract from the U.S. Department of Energy to build a compact, affordable fuel cell for boats.

Current fuel cells are typically too large and complex--not to mention expensive--for recreational boats; they also usually require a supply of bottled hydrogen gas as a fuel source. But Cummins is setting out to build a less-expensive solid-oxide fuel cell (SOFC) that can derive power from natural gas, diesel, or gasoline.

"Our initial design will include a fuel reformer that will convert natural gas into a form of fuel usable by the fuel-cell stack," explains Paul Plahn, director of advanced product development at Cummins Power Generation.

Under the contract, Cummins will also develop the D.C.-to-A.C. power inverter, electronic controls, thermal management, and the physical housing for the fuel cell.

Virgin Islands Marina
Apart from a few bars that serve boaters who come to see its underwater caves, Norman Island in the British Virgin Islands has long remained uninhabited. Now the chief minister of the 50 islets that make up the BVI wants to build a new marina and shoreside accommodations there.

In November Ralph T. O'Neal announced his plans to construct four or five guest houses, a small marina, and a village condominium complex on one side of the 700-acre Norman Island. The second phase of the development will be the addition of a museum that will celebrate the island's history.

The project, which is expected to cost $10 million to $15 million, is slated to begin this month.

Riddle Me This
Do sea breezes tend to increase or decrease as the day goes on? When docking with a strong wind abeam, will the bow or stern fall off first?

If you know these answers ("increase" and "the bow," respectively), you'll probably be pretty good at the new boating trivia game "Who's the Skipper?" Combining tons of fascinating trivia in powerboating and sailing, the game lets you put your knowledge to the test against your family and friends. People with mixed levels of nautical experience can compete, too, because the game requires seasmanship knowledge, gaming skills, and a bit of luck. "Who's the Skipper?" is small enough to stow aboard your boat and costs $24.99. For more information contact Penchant Publishing at (800) 235-7221 or log on to www.penchantpublishing.com.

Previous page > Weevil to the Rescue, and more! > Page 1, 2

This article originally appeared in the June 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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