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Back to Basics Page 2

Back to Basics

Part 2: I noticed the complete absence of fumes at the Jarrett Bay plant.

By Elizabeth A. Ginns

   

Photo: Brownie Harris
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• Part 2: Jarrett Bay
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Jarrett Bay uses epoxy resin, which doesn’t produce the heat (hence the term “cold” molded) or fumes that polyurethane and vinylester resins do. In fact, I noticed the complete absence of fumes at the Jarrett Bay plant; visiting this construction facility was a breath of fresh air, literally, compared to some production facilities I have walked through.

The result of the countless hours of sanding and fairing is obvious in the mirror-like finish on a Jarrett Bay hull. Of course, this degree of hands-on work and customization does require a longer wait period than a production-line boat. Design concept to project completion takes about 16 months on average, depending on the size and scope of the project (some have taken more than three years), Davis reports, whereas people can walk into a production boat dealership and have a boat delivered to them in far less time. Says Tate Lawrence, who meets with customers and focuses on the second half of construction, “I do anything the customer wants, he’s just gotta be willing to wait for it.” But because of the way they’re built, says Davis, Jarrett Bay hulls are much lighter (“by about 20,000 pounds”) than comparable fiberglass boats and quieter (because of their wooden structure, the wood acts as a sound absorber). And he claims they’re stronger than a number of boats on the market today.

As for the way a Jarrett Bay performs on the water, I have yet to test one, and the water was flat calm on the day PMY Editor-in-Chief Richard Thiel tested the 68-foot Jarrett Bay he recently wrote about (“Personal Best,” March 2003). But what I can tell you is that if waiting a bit longer than you would have to for a production boat doesn’t bother you, and if you’re willing to go back to basics with a boat company that takes a true hands-on approach to construction, take a trip to Beaufort, North Carolina, where it appears that good things really do come to those who wait.

Jarrett Bay Boatworks Phone: (252) 728-2690. www.jarrettbay.com.

Next page > Part 3: Design concept to project completion takes about 16 months on average. > Page 1, 2, 3

This article originally appeared in the August 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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