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See(ing)-Through is Believing Page 2

See(ing)-Through is Believing

Part 2: The water streamed off like a sprinter doing the 100-meter.

By Capt. Patrick Sciacca — April 2004

   

Photos: Matt Helminski
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Diamon-FusionUSA
• Part 2: Diamon-FusionUSA
• Treated vs. Untreated Glass
• Diamon-Fusion Technology


 Related Resources
• Maintenance Index

 Elsewhere on the Web
• Royce Industries

The company says the chemical bond in the glass forms a “hydrophobic barrier” and creates large beads because the water droplets maintain about a 118-degree angle to the pane’s surface (typically water clings to glass and sits at an angle of about 15 degrees). Whatever the angle, one thing was certain: The water streamed off like a sprinter doing the 100-meter. Sparaco claims that if a boater was running a vessel through bad weather, a treated window might not even need windshield wipers (although Sparaco and I say if you got ‘em, use ‘em).

However, the ability to run through bad weather without wipers isn’t the only advantage claimed for this technology. Sparaco says that a treated window is a clearer window and therefore enhances visibility. A Diamon-Fusion-treated pane is also supposed to resist mildew and scratching, which means a longer life for your vessel’s glass. In other words, lower maintenance costs.

The company says you can use any glass cleaner to keep a Diamon-Fusion-treated pane clean. It does, however, offer a liquid maintenance product, which you can apply and wipe off with a rag and is said to help maintain the luster gained by the chemical-bonding process.

So it’s easy to apply and maintain, and it seems to offer numerous benefits. Where do you sign up?

Ah, therein lies the rub. Diamon-Fusion’s technology isn’t available as an after-market product since, as explained earlier, it works best on new windows. Sparaco says that while you could treat a “contaminated” piece of glass on an older boat, the results wouldn’t be as good as if you treated an uncontaminated piece. So while you can’t exactly get this technology for your boat by calling your repair yard tomorrow, steps are being taken to help make this process readily available for your next boat.

Diamon-FusionUSA recently completed successful beta testing withTaylor Made Systems, a major supplier of boat windshields, and is implementing a test program with some boatbuilders to show the long-term benefits of this process. And check out the PMY Web site for an upcoming video on PMY TV, where we’ll put Diamon-Fusion through the gauntlet onboard our own test boat. Since the process is best done at the point the glass is manufactured, Diamon-FusionUSA is seeking to get OEMs onboard to offer its system as an option, just like an electronics package or a tuna tower. In addition, Diamon-FusionUSA is reported to be franchising the system around the United States to help expand its network of trained technicians and to ensure the technology is available to more boat owners.

The company is currently exhibiting its product at boat shows around the country. If you get the chance, I suggest stopping by and watching a demonstration. After all, as they say, seeing is believing.

Diamon-FusionUSA Phone: (866) DIAMON-1. www.diamonfusionusa.com.

Next page > Treated vs. Untreated Glass > Page 1, 2, 3, 4

This article originally appeared in the March 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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