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Pass the Popcorn

Pass the Popcorn - Flat-Panel TVs
Pass the Popcorn

From simple setups to cinematic extravaganzas, the options for your onboard viewing pleasures are nearly endless.

By Diane M. Byrne — March 2002

   
 
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• Part 1: Flat Panels
• Part 2: Flat Panels
• Part 3: Flat Panels


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My brother-in-law is an entertainment system junkie. He has so many high-tech components with remote controls capable of doing nearly everything under the sun, I’m sure he can turn on the television in his neighbor’s house across the street. Not content with simply watching the New York Rangers on a standard TV, he bought a 27-inch flat-screen and a top-shelf DVD player and hooked them up to the stereo (itself a marvel of modern engineering). Then he attached a PlayStation 2 video-game system to the whole setup, readily admitting it was more for his enjoyment than my nine-year-old nephew’s. In essence, he’s transformed the living room into a single-screen Surround Sound amusement park for couch potatoes.

He’s not alone in wanting to experience every slap of the puck, every dinosaur’s footfall in Jurassic Park, or every slalom course in the "SSX Tricky" video game. We Americans are obsessed with home entertainment systems. But what about our boats? If you have a relatively new cruiser, chances are she came with a small conventional TV or two, but chances also are that if you like to cruise for a few days at a time and/or entertain, you find those screens just don’t cut it anymore.

That’s where flat-screen televisions come in. Available from familiar home-electronic names like Sony, Toshiba, Phillips, Fujitsu, and Pioneer, they’re finding their way into more and more boatbuilders’ and marine-electronics installers’ order books. They’re appearing everywhere from saloons to galleys onboard a wide variety of production and semicustom boats as well as megayachts. And while the largest ones are more likely to be found onboard megayachts due to their size (and, more so, their expense), they all permit owners to enjoy the same comforts of home while anchored off their favorite sandy spit.

Next page > Flat Panels continued > Page 1, 2, 3

This article originally appeared in the February 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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