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Christensen 142 Primadonna Page 2

Christensen’s Primadonna By Diane. M. Byrne — November 2002

Show Girl
Part 2: A feast for the senses
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Primadonna
• Part 2: Primadonna continued
• Primadonna Specs
• Primadonna Deck Plan
• Primadonna Photo Gallery


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There's a feast for the rest of the senses throughout Primadonna due to the collaborative efforts of Christensen's in-house project manager Robert Emerson, interior design firm Paola D. Smith & Associates, and the various subcontractors who supplied the marble and inlay work. While the 70,000-square-foot yard houses an electrical department, plumbing and pipe fitting department, a metal shop, two paint shops (one for wood, the other for metal), and an upholstery shop, Christensen relied on subcontractors to handle the complex custom glass work, stone work, and inlays. While previous launches have featured the handiwork of subcontractors, Emerson says coordinating all of the agents for Primadonna made her one of the most complicated yachts he's worked on. Jeff Homchick, the Seattle-based marble expert who's well-known in megayacht-construction circles, directed the selection and installation of the nearly one dozen different marbles. Savoy Studios in Portland, Oregon, and Belina Interiors of Seattle did the glass installation and decorative metal work, respectively, although the glass pieces for the dining table and saloon's coffee table were actually crafted in Holland.

The first place where guests see how the juggling act came together is the starboard-side foyer on the main deck. Here they're greeted by an intricate sole detail comprised of hand-chipped glass pieces and madrona wood inlays that are in turn arranged on a mirrored surface. The effect lends depth and sparkle to the overall design.

Aft, in the saloon, madrona wood columns flank a glass panel that's adorned with a shell pattern, and the tops of the wood columns feature metal "leaves," much like palm fronds. The coffee table in front of the settees features a combination of etched glass and marquetry, the latter of which is fashioned in the shape of a whale. Not creative enough for you? Head up the stairs to the sky lounge, where you'll see a good deal of the already abundant fiber optics onboard. The sole (well, the areas of it not covered with leopard-print carpet) lights up, perfect for midnight dancing. Overhead, zodiac symbols twinkle for extra effect.

Even the master bath features fiber optics--plus another noteworthy touch. The marble counters are lined with fiber optics that, when turned on, make them glow from beneath. The most extraordinary feature, however, is the shower separating "his" side from "hers." It has a waterfall effect that will be the envy of many a yacht owner. When the water is turned on, it cascades over what some home-improvement stores term a spillway lip--basically a cup mounted to the bulkhead--and into a series of other spillways.

Of course, not everything about Primadonna is dressed to the nth degree, but the focus does remain squarely on fun. There's a sizable hot tub on the flying bridge, for example, and the large bar has not only a dumbwaiter for bringing up delectables from the galley but also a Rum Runner machine (and no, I didn't get to test it out, much to my chagrin that hot day...). One of the yacht's two tenders plus two PWC are stowed aft of the fixed hardtop. (While guests likely won't venture back here, if they do they should step carefully, since there's no hatch or gate covering the stairs leading down to the aft deck.)

And what about those speakers mentioned earlier--the ones to each side of the sunbed on the bow? Suffice it to say that when John Lance, Christensen's marketing director, turned on the music to demonstrate the quality of the sound system, the boat was rockin'.

In fact, shortly the cool rhythms emmanating from the speakers kicked up the heat of an already hot summer's day.

Christensen Shipyards Phone: (360) 695-3238. Fax: (360) 695-4762. www.christensenyachts.com.

Next page > Primadonna Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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