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Voyaging

Timeless Charm

Timeless Charm

Mallorca proves an enchanting hideaway during a windy week aboard CD Two in Spain’s Balearic Isles.

Story & Photos by Kim Kavin

   

Photo: Kim Kavin
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Balearic Islands
• Part 2: Balearic Islands
• Part 3: Balearic Islands
• Balearic Islands Photo Gallery


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It’s hard to fall in love when time is against you. Ask a boater given just a day to explore a place he’d rather settle into for an entire summer, a gastronome rushed through a meal, or a would-be mother pushing 45. All will tell you that with just a little more time, they might have found whatever it was that stirred their passion before they were forced to leave their slip, their table, or their youth behind.

That many of us allow such a merciless pace to tear apart our daily lives is unfortunate, but that some of us let it dominate our vacations is unforgivable. How in the world can we fall in love with the world if our itineraries are a mad dash to cruise as far and as fast as we can?

I came to this realization by force (nearly gale force, actually) during a four-day charter aboard the 140-foot CD Two in Spain’s Balearic Isles. The plan had been to spend a night in Mallorca’s bustling city of Palma, then a night at the clubs on Ibiza, and a day hiking the pristine countryside on Menorca. Instead, with wind frothing the Western Mediterranean into an impassable sea, we made it only a few miles from Palma to Puerto Portals, just up Mallorca’s coast. And there we stayed, quite comfortably, at the shelter of the dock.
In retrospect, the charter brokers who were along for the cruise and I were lucky. We got to know CD Two and her crew much better than we otherwise would have—and to spend time falling in love with quaint out-of-the-way places our original itinerary had left off completely.

CD Two is coming fully into her own 15 years after her keel was laid. Something went wrong with the original owner’s funds after construction began in 1988, and she finally launched in 1995, as the 125-foot Independent of London. A 15-foot garage was added a year later, and she began life with an owner who saw maintenance as optional. When the current owner bought the yacht in 2002, her exterior needed paint, her saloon sole was covered in dog paw scratches, and her interior screamed pink and turquoise. “It was so ’80’s, but it looked ’60’s,” laments Capt. Peter Leeming. “It was dreadful.”

Next page > Part 2: CD Two is a comfortable and roomy yacht that easily accommodates 12 guests. > Page 1, 2, 3, 4

This article originally appeared in the October 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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