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Megayachts

True Colors

Exclusive: Hargrave’s Sassy By Kim Kavin — August 2004

True Colors

The 94-foot Hargrave Capri Sassy gives her family of owner-operators everything that suits their style.
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Hargrave Sassy
• Part 2: Hargrave Sassy
• Hargrave Charter Fleet
• Hargrave Sassy Specs
• Hargrave Sassy Deck Plans
• Hargrave Sassy Photo Gallery


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Interior designer Shelley DiCondina didn’t know what to say when she met the owners of the 94-foot Sassy.

“I about fainted when all seven of them walked into the meeting. I asked which ones were staying,” says DiCondina, owner of Yacht Interiors by Shelley. When she realized all of the McGuirk family’s adults would have a say in the first motoryacht they had ever built together, she thought the process of making simple decisions might turn into committee meetings from hell. “I told them it should be like the Olympics,” she recalls with a laugh. “Everybody holds up a card with a number to vote on the fabrics.”

Much to her relief, and to the relief of everyone at Hargrave, the McGuirk family turned out to be heavenly clients. The seven adults and their six children have been boating together for years aboard smaller powerboats, and they had definite ideas about what they wanted in their first large-scale, owner-operated yacht: a top speed around 24 knots with a 22-knot cruise, comfortable places for everyone to sleep, customized amenities, and plenty of color inside.

The first three requirements were nothing new for Hargrave, but the fourth left some folks at the boatbuilding facility a bit on edge as the builder’s second-ever 94 Capri made her way down the production line.

“Our average owners are 60 or older, fairly beige at that point in life, where these are just wild,” says Mike Joyce, Hargrave’s president and CEO. “When we first started to put it together, our guy at the factory worried that we shouldn’t take it to a boat show. He said, ‘This is going to scare people.’ When it all went together, he loved it. At the boat show, we got a lot of wows. If you like this boat, you really like it.”

DiCondina says Sassy was one of the most challenging interior design jobs she’s had since entering the business in 1986. The Michigan-based family was pleasant to work with, she says, but few clients ask for bright blues, reds, and yellows—especially clients who plan to offer their yacht for charter, as Sassy’s do this fall in the Great Lakes and Thousand Islands. (See “Hargrave Charter Fleet,” this story.) “They wanted a primary color, sculpted inlay rug,” she recalls. “I thought, ‘Are you kidding? We used to do that in the ’70s.’”

In the end, she and Hargrave’s team were able not only to accommodate the McGuirks’ wishes for a bold palette and other custom touches, but to do so in a way that should help the $4.25-million yacht retain her long-term value.

For example, the accommodations spaces are traditionally styled with a neutral decor, while on the main deck, the sculpted-inlay rug graces the main saloon as requested. Suede chairs, sofas, and pillows are all designed to match. Yet all the vibrant color on this deck can be easily replaced should the McGuirks ever decide to sell the yacht. “You could take out all of that color for the next owner,” DiCondina says. “The sky lounge would be the only problem.”

Indeed, up the floating staircase is one of the most personalized spaces aboard Sassy: a combined pilothouse-sky lounge done almost entirely in royal and marine blues. DiCondina says the goal was to create a disco, but the owner-operators had practical applications in mind as well.

Next page > Part 2: “It’s everything they dreamed it would be and more.” > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the July 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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