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Megayachts

Hail, Conquering Heroine

Tarrab’s Siesser’s PalaceBy Diane M. Byrne March 2001

Hail, Conquering Heroine
Forget Egypt’s fall to Rome—the 92-foot Siesser’s Palace will make guests succumb to the luxurious cruising lifestyle.
   
 
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• Part 1: Siesser’s Palace
• Part 2: Siesser’s Palace continued
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Cleopatra never had it so good.

Sure, as Hollywood portrayed it, she made a grand entrance into Rome by riding on a giant sphinx pulled by numerous servants, and she was crowned queen by Caesar. But she never received anything like this from Caesar. This floating palace—or, to be more accurate, the all-fiberglass, 92-foot Siesser’s Palace built by Tarrab Yachts—is an elegant entertainment platform that would make even the ill-tempered asp smile.

One of the things that attracted the owners to the Argentina-based yard is the fact that they were able to commission a true custom yacht, something hard to find in the 80- to 100-foot size range. Even though it does provide “standard” layouts for clients to choose from, Tarrab lets owners do their own space planning (with the exception of moving structural bulkheads) and select whatever soft goods and machinery they wish.

And select they did. The owners tapped interior designer Paola Smith to ensure the interior of their yacht would have enduring appeal and be able to accommodate their numerous family members. Bird’s-eye maple paneling, black granite accents, and silk fabrics in beige, taupe, and black treat everyone to chic surroundings.

While it’s common to find a combination saloon-dining area onboard yachts this size, whether fully custom or not, Siesser’s Palace reserves the saloon solely for entertaining and does so in a way that permits different clusters of people around the room to enjoy themselves. For example, large settees forward face each other across the 21'6" beam, making it easy to converse or watch the television contained within the lacquered wood entertainment center that was beautifully created by Tarrab’s own craftsmen. Wood pillars atop sideboards separate this area from the port-side table and chairs aft, where it’s easy to imagine a card game breaking out. Here, too, the table, featuring a star-pattern center inlay, was created by Tarrab’s expert joinerymen. Four more people can sit at the bar opposite of here. Even with all of these seating areas, there’s still plenty of open floor space.

Given the focus on entertainment in the saloon, Siesser’s Palace has a country kitchen setup in the galley, which occupies the full forward portion of the yacht. Other vessels in Tarrab’s Wide Body Series (of which this 92-footer is a part) have galleys equipped solely for food preparation yet still knock the socks off even those who are unable or unwilling to boil water, due to the combination of the wide beam, effective space planning, and abundance of black granite counter space. The galley onboard Siesser’s Palace keeps up the tradition of dressing to impress. There are black granite countertops as well as black appliances, combining to make the area less kitchen-like in appearance. The large, U-shape banquette and big windows to each side aid in this regard, too. Another outstanding feature is the large pantry to port: It’s a walk-in compartment and contains a full-size Sub-Zero freezer, which is put to good use on long cruises and when crowds are onboard for meals.

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> Siesser’s Palace continued > Page 1, 2, 3, 4

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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