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Now, Voyager Page 2

Newcastle Marine’s Newcastle Voyager By Diane M. Byrne — October 2003

Now, Voyager
Part 2: It looks like Miller’s hunch about this “hot ticket” is paying off.
   


 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Newcastle Voyager
• Part 2: Newcastle Voyager
• Newcastle Voyager Specs
• Deck Plan
• Photo Gallery


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To address the "white yacht" luxuries, Newcastle Marine chose raised-panel mahogany to line the various rooms, complemented by granite as well as polished brass and stainless steel fittings. According to Keith, more than a handful of people who've stepped into the saloon from the aft deck have coincidentally blurted out the same colorful expression when they've taken in how its mahogany-lined luxury presents a dramatic change from the rugged, go-anywhere exterior styling.

Typical of most yachts in this size range, expedition or not, the master stateroom is forward on the main deck, with his and her heads. Not typical--of any size or style of yacht--is the round port in the shared walk-in wardrobe. Upon first glance, it may seem strange, even whimsical, but if you give it further consideration, it's a practical way of literally shedding light on the problem of, say, confusing navy socks with black ones.

Guests are treated to well-sized staterooms below decks, but the crew accommodations down here are most worthy of note. If ever a crew member decided to leave this yacht, it certainly wouldn't be for lack of room, as each of the three bunk-berthed staterooms is more generous than the crew accommodations on many comparable-size yachts. Even the combination mess/galley (yes, they have their own galley) is liberal. In fact, the area is the size of the only galley aboard many custom yachts in the 100- to 130-foot range. (In contrast, however, the main-deck galley aboard the Newcastle Voyager is smaller than you'd expect of a yacht in this size range, although it does have a steward's refrigerator as well as a standard refrigerator and freezer, plus there's a walk-in refrigerator and freezer below decks.)

Keeping in mind that a potential owner of this spec yacht might want to take adventurous cruises to warm-weather destinations or make her available for charter, Newcastle Marine equipped the 125 with PWC stowage (and a crane to launch the toys) on the foredeck as well as a private play area up top. The latter has an extra degree of exclusivity thanks to the height of the bulwarks, which rise to the thigh on most adults, thereby preventing any dock-walkers from seeing sunbathers. Sun chairs and a Jacuzzi tub cater to relaxing afternoons in the sun, and a bar and barbecue take care of any gastronomical needs that guests might have. In keeping with the idea of not wasting space, Newcastle concealed a sauna and day head in the base of the mast.

While Keith and Miller await the sale of the 125 (she's offered for $10.9 million through Camper & Nicholsons' Fort Lauderdale office), it looks like Miller's hunch about this "hot ticket" is paying off: Keith says the pair has had discussions with a few potential clients. The interested owners fit the profile he and Miller envisioned all those years ago when they started the yard: hard-core cruisers who are attracted to the general reputation of expedition yachts' durability and stability and the 125's particular take on styling and system redundancy.

The one difference, however, is the sizes being discussed--while Keith didn't elaborate on specifics, he did say they vary. Perhaps one of these owners will borrow a page from Miller's book and take the relationship to yet another extreme.

Luiz De Basto Designs Phone: (305) 373-1500. www.luizdebasto.com.
DeJong and Lebet Phone: (904) 399-3673. www.dejongandlebet.com.
Newcastle Marine Phone: (386) 447-0999. www.newcastlemarineinc.com.

Next page > Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This article originally appeared in the September 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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