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Sabreline 42 Express Page 2

Sabreline 42 ExpressBy George L. Petrie — January 2004

The Maine Ingredient

Part 2: Fine craftsmanship abounds.
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Sabreline 42
• Part 2: Sabreline 42
• Sabreline 42 Specs
• Sabreline 42 Deck Plan
• Sabreline 42 Acceleration Curve
• Sabreline 42 Photo Gallery


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Complementing the handsome exterior, her lower deck is impeccably finished in cherry joinery, with teak-and-holly soles throughout. A focal point in the saloon is the flawlessly varnished dinette table that boasts a beautiful bird’s-eye maple inlay. Softening the tone of the wood, the settee is upholstered with Ultrasuede fabric, standard.

Fine craftsmanship abounds, as evidenced by the dovetail joints in the maple drawer boxes, the concealed hinges in all cabinets, and the teak lip that rims each Corian countertop. Standard appliances are equally first-rate, including a Sub-Zero refrigerator with freezer, a ceramic cooktop, and a built-in microwave.

In the bow, the master stateroom is generously proportioned, punctuated by a pedestal berth accessible from three sides and rimmed by a warren of drawers, cabinets, and lockers. Headroom of 6'5" enhances the sense of spaciousness, while a large overhead hatch and opening port make the space feel airy.

For guests, the second stateroom provides a quiet sitting area by day with a comfortable L-shape settee. Fitted with slide-out bottom and filler cushions, the settee converts to a double berth. An optional fold-up table lets the space double (or triple?) as an office.

Having been duly impressed thus far by the imposing scope of the 42’s standard features, I was eager to check out her engine room, which revealed another advantage of her raised helm deck. There’s a good 5'7" of headroom; not quite full standing room, but more than on most boats in this size range. Owners can choose among any of three gensets (with hushbox) in the 12.5- to 13.5-kW range, enough to run all three air-conditioning units, plus all other A.C. appliances, at the same time. Our test boat was fitted with an inverter and an additional 900-amp battery capacity that would allow her owner more than two days of cruising without having to run the genset. However, I was disappointed that the engine-mounted oil filters were on the starboard side of both engines, necessitating a tight squeeze to get to the outboard side of the starboard engine.

I was not disappointed in the 42’s construction. Her hull is cored with PVC foam below the waterline and end-grain balsa above. All core materials are vacuum-bagged to ensure uniform bonding, and the hull is laminated with a high-heat resin to resist post-cure distortion. Her bottom is molded to the same proven form as that of the Sabreline 42 Sedan Flybridge.

Running the 42 Express along the scenic Eastern Shore of the Chesapeake, I was pleased by her nimble handling and spirited performance. Cruising at 2000 rpm, she ran an easy 20 knots, averaging 0.74 nmpg. Tracking and maneuvering were steady and predictable, and she exhibited no significant bow rise throughout the rpm range.

The 42 Express offers a lot of options, but the breadth of her standard features impressed me most. Crafted by artisans who have a respect for the sea that’s been forged on the rugged coast of Maine, her “standards” are truly exceptional.

Sabre Yachts Phone: (207) 655-3831. www.sabreyachts.com.

Next page > Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the December 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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