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Boats

Carver 360 Sport Sedan

Exclusive PMY Boat Test: Carver 360 Sport Sedan
Carver 360 Sport Sedan — By Richard Thiel September 2002

Space Case
Carver does it again, with a 36-footer that has the interior volume of a larger boat.
   
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• Part 1: Carver 360
• Part 2: Carver 360 continued
• Carver 360 Specs
• Carver 360 Deck Plan
• Carver 360 Acceleration Curve
• Carver 360 Photo Gallery


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The Carver 360 Sport Sedan is the second in a series that debuted in 2001 with the 410 Sport Sedan. The idea behind it is to offer boaters a command bridge (sedan) alternative to the company's aft cabins and Mariner models while keeping the extra interior volume that Carver is noted for.

Carver has a reputation for getting maximum living space out of every foot, and it's earned it by challenging conventional ideas of what a boat should look like. You don't need to be a marine architect to see where the 360's volume comes from: She's tall for her length. What you don't see right away is the design sleight of hand that translates that added volume into living space.

The pieces of the 360 are familiar: two staterooms, a dinette, a galley, and a saloon, but how they're arranged is not. The V-berth master is about the size you'd expect in a boat this size. Three cabinets and hanging lockers bracket the requisite queen-size berth, and overhead lamps provide light for reading, but oddly you can't aim them. A hatch takes care of air and daytime light, and you can order a 14-inch TV with DVD player for the starboard aft bulkhead. Beneath the bed is more stowage in a deep drawer and shallow cabinet.

Aft and to port is a large head with doors to the master and a vestibule. The head has a large shower stall occupied by a standard Vacuflush MSD. There's also a small cabinet for toilet paper, but since its doors don't close tightly, expect soggy TP after a shower. A larger locker above is for things like shampoo and soap. The bifold shower door is sturdy, but the stay that keeps it open had already broken onboard our boat. Outside the stall is a vanity with an FRP countertop, whose attractive surface mimics Corian, and more stowage, a recurring theme on the 360.

One of the ways Carver maximizes space on the 360 is by employing pocket doors between the master and the vestibule and between the vestibule and the stateroom aft of it. Twin berths, which with the insertion of a filler convert to a double, take up a large part of that stateroom. The foam mattress seemed comfortable, and there's a lot of stowage, especially in two deep starboard lockers, and two halogen reading lights that unlike the master's can be aimed.

If you're looking for the aspect of the layout that allows for a second cabin with decent headroom, just look at the saloon: The dinette above it is elevated three steps from the main deck. This is a classic Carver maneuver: It looks a little weird, but when you use it, you realize it's inspired. Anyone sitting here gets a 360-degree view--out the windshield, both side windows, and the aft glass sliding door--so it's a great place to watch the world go by, whether at anchor or underway, and since it abuts the port galley, meal service is easy. About the only thing the dinette isn't perfect for is watching TV, since the standard 20-incher--along with the DVD player and AM/FM stereo/CD player--is immediately abaft the galley. Fortunately, a starboard Ultraleather Flexsteel sofa (with stowage beneath) is perfectly placed for viewing.

Next page > Carver 360 continued > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the December 2002 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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