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Sea Vee 340I

Sea Vee 340I — By Capt. Patrick Sciacca January 2001

The Lady Can Dance
Sea Vee's 340I not only offers speed and space, but  she's agile, too.
   
 
 More of this Feature
• Part 1: Sea Vee 340I
• Part 2: Sea Vee 340I continued
• Sea Vee 340I Specs
• Sea Vee 340I Deck Plan
• Sea Vee 340I Acceleration Curve

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It was a hot day off Miami as I held onto my spinning gear and performed the light-tackle tango with a hefty mahi-mahi. It was then that I realized the Sea Vee 340I is a great dance partner.

I'd first boarded the 340I ("I" for inboard) at last February's Miami International Boat Show. Although she wasn't in the water, a brief tour of this walkaround showed me that she'd been built by a boatbuilder that doesn't work by the clock. Besides, seeing the boat on land afforded me the chance to get an up-close look at the solid-glass bottom. It's vacuum-bagged to solidify the bonding process between the knitted bi- and tri-axial fabrics as well as the Divinycell PVC core. Vinylester resin is used as a bonding agent and moisture barrier, and the gelcoat can be ordered in a variety of colors, the most popular being bright and pale yellow. This boat was a bright canary yellow, and I figured that a boat that looked that fast had to move.

In early May Sea Vee called to let me know there was a boat in the water ready to test. At 8:00 a.m. on test day it was already steamy as I walked down the Miami Beach Marina dock to meet Ariel Pared, owner of Sea Vee Boats, and PMY's Capt. Bill Pike, who had flown down on his vacation to ride along.

Pared lifted the front of the center console to reveal two 300-hp Yanmar diesels so we could hook up our fuel-flow gear. The engines were a comfortable fit: I was able to get just about my whole body underneath and access about 90 percent of both. Pared told me that the tower on our test boat could be easily unhinged so the standard hydraulic lift system could open the console and provide full access to the engines, if necessary.

Next page > Sea Vee 340I continued > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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