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Pursuit 3370 Offshore Page 2

Pursuit 3370 Offshore By Capt. Bill Pike — March 2004

Speed Demon

Part 2: The Pursuit 3370 Offshore is a performance fishboat.
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Pursuit 3370
• Part 2: Pursuit 3370
• Pursuit 3370 Specs
• Pursuit 3370 Deck Plan
• Pursuit 3370 Acceleration Curve
• Pursuit 3370 Photo Gallery


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I’d had a chance to examine the thing at the plant (see photo, page 107). It was a good half-inch thick and about as structurally complex as the underbody of a modern automobile. Not only does it solidify the bow, running surface, and hull sides, it buttresses the marine-ply-cored transom with four huge, knee-like gussets, each seemingly capable of handling the thrust of two 300-hp Yamaha outboards all by its lonesome. Create such a grid with the same epoxy-infusion techniques used to build our test boat’s hull, bond it in place with Plexus methacrylate adhesive as well as a raft of sophisticated bonding techniques, and in my opinion you’ve got yourself one of the gutsiest 30-footers ever to blast a wave.

Of course, most prototypes have an issue or two, and our test boat was no exception. For starters, while maneuvering in the marina, an exercise I typically do while standing, I noticed the helm seat (which adjusts horizontally but not vertically) was too low to serve as a leaning post—I’m 5'11", and the bottom of the back pockets of my blue jeans was the highest point the seat would reach. Moreover, because the bolsterless leading edge of the seat cushion is slightly shorter than the StarBoard polymer bottom, trying to go the leaning-post route, while not precisely a pain in the butt, turned out to be a pain in the thighs.

The installation of the fuel-water separators constituted the next glitch: They were mounted behind a little hatch at the rear of the cockpit on the port side and so obfuscated by inlet and outlet hoses that screwing them on/off is going to be difficult and spill-prone. Pursuit should enlarge the hatch or create a user-friendlier configuration for the hoses.

The optional genset was the final issue. While mounting it well aft in a cramped interior space roughly below the livewell makes servicing and inspection through access hatches dicey, I noted a more glaring fault: There is no way to remove it other than to break out a reciprocating saw and have at it. The fix? How about installing a “soft patch” or, better yet, toss the genset entirely—below decks, carbon-monoxide-emitting gensets on small boats with cabins are worrisome from the safety angle, anyway—and go with a beefed-up battery bank and inverter?

I was pondering this point when Glenn yelled, “Hey, Bill.” A splash enlivened the water behind a ballyhoo. Then the Shimano TLD20 emitted a short screech. Glenn beat me to the rod by a nautical mile, levered the drag, yanked back to set the hook, and handed it off. I proceeded to lift and wind with enthusiasm. “Tip up,” shouted Glenn as the dolphin shot across our wake.

I could go on to extol the fishy virtues of our test boat that promptly surfaced—stuff like the wraparound coaming pads that make working a fish easy on your legs, or the cutting board at the rigging station that facilitates filleting, or the easy-to-get-hold-of cockpit washdown that makes cleanup easy and immediate—but I want to avoid undue piscatorial emphasis.

The Pursuit 3370 Offshore is a performance fishboat. And truth to tell, I’m not sure which was the most fun: nailing a couple of nice, eminently grillable slabs of fresh dolphin or making the run back to Fort Pierce at a scalding top speed of 48.9 mph.

Pursuit Boats Phone: (561) 465-6006. www.pursuitboats.com.

Next page > Pursuit 3370 Offshore Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the February 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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