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Boats

Viking Sport Cruisers 75

EXCLUSIVE: Viking Sport Cruisers 75 By George L. Petrie — October 2003

A Sure Thing
With Viking Sport Cruisers’ 75, there’s no gambling on comfort, quality, and performance.
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Viking SC 75
• Part 2: Viking SC 75
• Viking SC 75 Specs
• Viking SC 75 Deck Plan
• Viking SC 75 Acceleration Curve
• Viking SC 75 Photo Gallery


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As luck would have it, our venue for testing the latest addition to the Viking Sport Cruisers line was Atlantic City, New Jersey, with some of the biggest casinos on the East Coast dotting the horizon. As I approached this gaming Mecca, it occurred to me how willing we sometimes are to take chances, to play a hunch. Penny ante or high stakes, for business or pleasure, taking a risk often enhances the moment for many of us.

But there are also occasions when it’s best not to take chances—forego the risk and pick a sure thing. The purchase of a $3 million motoryacht qualifies as such an occasion, so it came as no surprise to learn that the owner of this newest Viking Sport Cruiser was a five-time customer. Having owned four other Vikings (two Convertibles and two Sport Cruisers), he was leaving nothing to chance in moving up to the 75-foot motoryacht.

What is it, I asked myself, that gets a customer to come back five times in a row? Satisfactory experience is obviously part of the answer, but what else? Confidence? Peace of mind? Attention to detail? Or is it something inherent in the product? As I scoured through the yacht, I kept looking for clues.

One thing was certain: It was not the standard interior decor selections that brought this owner back. The striking tiger-stripe saloon carpeting and similar motifs carried throughout the interior had clearly been chosen to suit his distinctive style and preferences. Thus, I concluded, part of what brought this man back to Viking was the builder’s willingness to customize the interior decor rather than constraining him with a fixed palette of colors and textures.

Like many yachts of this style, the 75’s main deck offers an open interior layout that creates a sense of spaciousness, enhanced by large side windows in the saloon and an electrically powered sliding glass door onto the aft deck. But she offers a number of distinctive features as well. For example, you can lower a glass panel aft of the port-side settee, opening the saloon to the aft deck even when the sliding door is shut. With the addition of optional side curtains surrounding the aft deck, the entire space can become a single, climate-controlled, indoor/outdoor area.

Forward of the saloon, a single step up delineates the dining area and galley to port. Normally the galley is open, but for a more formal atmosphere, retractable panels can be raised to close off the galley from the rest of the interior. An especially nice feature is a door directly from the galley to the side deck, so crew can bring aboard stores and stow them without having to traipse through the saloon.

Another nice interior feature is the circular seating area to port, opposite the helm station. Roomier than it first appears, the settee accommodates at least four adults, and the table is big enough to accommodate drinks and a light lunch, all while maintaining a view of the helm and foredeck. This arrangement also appealed to the owner, whose captain has been with him for many years and who is considered a virtual member of the family.

Next page > Part 2: I found the 75 to be impressively quiet. > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the September 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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