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Pacific Mariner 65 Page 2

PMY Boat Test: Pacific Mariner 65 continued
Pacific Mariner 65— By Richard Thiel — August 1998

Priced to Move
Part 2: So how does Pacific Mariner bring such a well-built, well-equipped, well-performing yacht to market for such a remarkable price?
   
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Pacific Mariner 65
• Part 2: Pacific Mariner 65 continued
• Pacific Mariner 65 Specs
• Pacific Mariner 65 Deck Plan


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The helm is smartly laid out: Not only are there two chart drawers to port, there’s space (and a spot lamp) on top where you can actually lay out a chart and work on it. The instrument panel has two tiers, with two DDEC (8V-92 DDECs are standard) and two B&G Network displays flanking a Ritchie Magtronic fluxgate compass on top. Below are a Northstar 941XD GPS, Laserplot Chartnav (14-inch monitor), Furuno FVC 582 color sounder, Furuno 1942 64-mile radar, and ICOM M127 VHF. There are repeaters for the B&G units and Magtronic and an ICOM M59 VHF on the bridge. (A Heart Interface 2500 inverter and KVH Tracvision II satellite receiver are also part of the electronics package.) The engine controls (DDEC single-levers, of course) are right next to the control for the Jabsco spotlight and joystick for the 25-hp HPS bow thruster. Everything is standard.

That joystick should make maneuvering the boat easier;  designer Bill Garden wanted the 65 to be handled by a couple. For the same reason, the 65 has wide, well-protected side decks that make it easy to move among the foredeck, pilothouse, and aft deck. And once you’re aft, you’ll have a pair of 1,200-pound Simpson Lawrence warping winches to help in docking or anchoring.

A curved companionway to starboard of the helm leads down to the accommodations. No scrimping on space here either, with a full-beam master aft (forward of the engine room) and a VIP in the forepeak, both with en suite heads (the master has a tub). Between them to port is a twin-berth stateroom; its head is at the foot of the stairway and accessed from the hallway, so it can function as a day head.

Nor were corners cut on the flying bridge. In addition to a fully equipped helm, it offers seating for six in a starboard, L-shape lounge and a Meile electric barbecue. There is no wetbar, but the 15-foot tender (built by Pacific Mariner) with 50-hp Mercury four-stroke and Nautical Structures davit are standard.

Pacific Mariner calls this a four-cabin yacht, and indeed, there is one more sleeping quarter in the lazarette that you pass through to reach the engine room. Accessed via a hatch in the cockpit’s transom seat, it offers a chest-style refrigerator, toilet, air conditioning, stacked washer and dryer, and a pair of bunks, but nowhere near the comfort and space of the other cabins. As crew or kids’ quarters, it’s ideal.

As you can see in the test results on the next page, Pacific Mariner gives full measure when it comes to performance: a 24-knot cruise and 432-NM cruise range. While I couldn’t evaluate her rough-water handling on the near-calm test day, our 65 was responsive and a pleasure to drive. And her sound levels demand mention. This is a very quiet boat, both underway and dockside. In the latter case, you must strain to hear the 20-kW Northern Lights genset from either the saloon or master stateroom. Underway, there is no shaft noise, and sound levels in the master stateroom barely break 70 db-A. Credit composite construction and extensive use of two-pound density acoustic insulation in the engine room.

So how does Pacific Mariner bring such a well-built, well-equipped, well-performing yacht to market for such a remarkable price? Mainly production efficiency: building virtually the same boat over and over. So if you can live with a true production motoryacht and trade the marble soles, granite countertops, and a flying bridge wetbar for a few hundred thousand bucks, this is your boat. It’s enough to inspire yet another oxymoron: practical boating.   

Pacific Mariner Phone: (360) 466-1189. Fax: (360) 466-1147. www.pacificmariner.com.

Next page > Pacific Mariner 65 Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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