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NauticBlue 464 Page 2

NauticBlue 464 By Richard Thiel — November 2003

Livin’ Large
Part 2: Indeed, after three days living aboard, our quartet gave our 464 high marks.
   
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• Part 1: NauticBlue 464
• Part 2: NauticBlue 464
• Advantageous Ownership
• NauticBlue 464 Specs
• NauticBlue 464 Deck Plan
• NauticBlue 464 Acceleration Curve
• NauticBlue 464 Photo Gallery


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Acceleration was more than adequate, although on our boat it came along with an extraordinary amount of smoke. Indeed, during full-throttle acceleration runs, the Yanmars actually left a fuel slick. I’ve been on plenty of boats powered by these engines and never seen anything like this. At one point I thought perhaps the engines were starved for air, so I tried a few runs with the hatches open. But the same thing happened. I was at a loss to explain this phenomenon, until the folks at NauticBlue told me the likely cause was substandard diesel fuel, which is apparently a common problem in the Virgins. Note that the smoke was objectionable only while we were under hard acceleration. At normal cruising speeds, emissions appeared to be normal.

Also normal—at least by catamaran standards—is the layout. If you’ve been on a cat, you know the drill: a main deck—in this case with saloon, galley, and lower helm—that far exceeds in room and airiness that of any comparably sized monohull and staterooms that are less so. Frankly, the trade-off worked quite well for us. Being in the tropics, we spent virtually all of our time either outside or in the saloon, which has a comfortable, aft-facing bench to port of the starboard helm and a large starboard-side dinette that handily seats six. The galley is along the port side, and we put its nearly full-size refrigerator and deep double sinks to good use, as we did the standard coffee maker and microwave here, all standard. We never used the three-burner ceramic stovetop.

Stowage up top is adequate, and we all agreed that installing a nifty tip-out trash bin in place of another large cabinet was a solid move. Not so solid was the bungee cord that kept it from opening all the way. We liked, but did not use, the flat-screen TV/DVD player that retracts into the overhead above the sink, and both used and liked the lower helm, which has good sightlines.

The four staterooms, accessed by port and starboard stairs down into the hulls, each have en suite heads and integral shower (no separate shower stall). Of roughly equal size, they also had only adequate stowage despite their generous length, thanks to the V-drives. Stowage is an issue on most catamarans, as the design precludes deep bilges where boaters love to stuff stuff. The berths were comfortable but lacked the walkaround feature of a comparably sized monohull’s master or VIP. (The three-cabin 463 does have an island berth in the master but is probably not as highly prized as a charter vessel, where the number of berths trumps all.) In any case, we found the rooms comfortable, in large part because we dumped a lot of our stuff in the two unused staterooms.

Indeed, after three days living aboard, our quartet gave our 464 high marks. We loved her quiet running, roomy saloon, and ability to eat up anything Drake’s Channel threw at us. Stowage wasn’t a problem for us, although it might have been had we been eight—an imprudent idea on any 46-footer. Add to that a nice turn of speed and good fuel efficiency, and you have one of the nicest cruising boats I’ve been aboard. And I swear I would have said that even if I’d tested her in the American Paradise.

NauticBlue Power Yacht Vacations Phone: (800) 416-0336. www.nauticblue.com.

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This article originally appeared in the October 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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