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Hinckley SC42 Page 3

Exclusive: Hinckley SC42 By Capt. Bill Pike — October 2004

State of the Art

A Different Kind of Exhaust

   


 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Hinckley SC42
• Part 2: Hinckley SC42
• A Different Kind of Exhaust
• Hinckley SC42 Specs
• Hinckley SC42 Deck Plan
• Hinckley SC42 Acceleration Curve
• Hinckley SC42 Photo Gallery


 Related Resources
• Boat Test Index

 Elsewhere on the Web
• The Hinckley Company

I tagged along with Capt. Bill Pike on the SC42 test, and one detail that turned our heads—actually helped to snap “em back during those WOT speed runs—is the somewhat ungainly named Integrated Exhaust Hull Structure (IEHS). By its nature IEHS almost disappears into the finished boat, but its effects are noticeable.

In the construction photo (right) you can see traditional round exhaust pipes about to be linked from the engine manifolds to decidedly nontraditional “dump boxes” (1), which are bonded both to the hull and to molded-in ducts that run back along the bilge to the aft “thrust slots” (2). As the big MAN 730s spool up, the many thousand cubic feet of exhaust not only exit those underwater slots quietly, and without a chance to splash or smudge the transom, but also help lift the SC42 onto plane. Then carefully calibrated wedges worked into the bottom just forward of the slots induce a suction that relieves the diesels of backpressure, accounting in part for the SC42’s sporty acceleration. Plus, at idle speeds, water sitting in the dump boxes helps with muffling and also switches the exit to the bypass pipe (3), which is sized fairly small so that the gases being ejected at the waterline (4) are accelerated away from the boat. To top it all off, the rugged and essentially simple system occupies less than half the space of conventional pipes and mufflers, which on the SC42 creates the space for two deep fishbox/lockers molded into the cockpit sole.

It’s a sign of Hinckley’s pursuit of better boatbuilding technology that it is one of the early adopters of IEHS, but the engineering is not exclusive to it or any company. George VonWidmann (www.vonwidmanndesigns.com) has spent nearly 15 years developing IEHS, and he says that some major boatbuilder contracts, as well as a new level of exhaust/hull integration, are about to be made public. Look for the whole story in next month’s PMY. —Ben Ellison

Next page > Hinckley SC42 Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7

This article originally appeared in the September 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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