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America’s 100 Largest Yachts 2003 Page 9

America’s 100 Largest Yachts - 2003

By Diane M. Byrne

   

71. Aria
Photo: Donna & Ken Chesler
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70. KANALOA • L: 157'5" Y: 1996
Kanaloa totes an abundance of toys, such as scuba and fishing gear, an Aquafin sailboat, windsurfers, and kayaks. She’s available for $165,000 (plus expenses) and up per week. B: CRN, Italy; N: Builder; H: Aluminum; E: 2/2,285-hp Deutz-MWMs

71. ARIA • L: 156'0" Y: 2001
Floridians Bob and Gail Milhous are such music lovers that they named their yacht in honor of it. The saloon’s U-shape settee was specifically designed to take full advantage of the Surround Sound audio system (including 1,000 CDs). They’re also movie buffs, with more than 200 DVDs available on demand. B: Sensation New Zealand, New Zealand; N: Builder; H: Aluminum; E: 2/2,650-hp Caterpillars

72. INSPIRATION • L: 156'0" Y: 1996
Real estate developer Charlie Roberts spent $500,000 to improve some of her spaces, like the sundeck, to be more attractive to charterers. There’s also a baby grand in the saloon. Inspiration is available this winter in the Caribbean for $110,000 and up per week. B: Broward Marine, USA; N: Builder; H: Aluminum; E: 2/2,200-hp Detroit Diesels

73. THEMIS • L: 156'0" Y: 1998
She’s named for the symbol of blind justice; fitting, since her owner is Ronald Motley, a successful litigator. He’s gone after asbestos makers and tobacco companies and just last December filed suit seeking to connect members of the Saudi royal family as well as Saudi businesses and charities to the September 11 attacks. B: Trinity Yachts, USA; N: Builder/Paragon Design; H: Aluminum; E: 2/2,250-hp Caterpillars

74. D’NATALIN II • L: 155'10" Y: 1999
D’Natalin II was cruising in the South of France in May, where one of our faithful readers saw the owners’ party playing cards on the aft deck. The owners also have another yacht on our list that bears a similar name to this one; see no. 88. B: Feadship/Royal Van Lent Shipyard, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/905-hp Caterpillars

75. APRIL FOOL • L: 155'8" Y: 2003
April Fool is the first yacht to emerge from International Shipyards Ancona (also known as ISA). She was launched in June at a lavish nighttime ceremony, where 1,500 people watched fireworks coordinated with Handel’s “Hallelujah Chorus.” April Fool features an innovative aft design, with two exterior spiral staircases connecting all her decks. Her owner is from New York. B: International Shipyards Ancona, Italy; N: Walter Franchini; H: Steel; E: 2/MTU 4000s

76. DOLCE FAR NIENTE • L: 155'0" Y: 1991
Formerly known as Shamwari, this Benetti sold within the past year to an unidentified American and interestingly is for sale yet again for $18.9 million. B: Benetti, Italy; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/1,950-hp MTUs

77. LIQUIDITY • L: 155'0" Y: 2001
Henry and Kelly Luken of long-distance company Covista Communications are awaiting the delivery of a 157-footer, so they’re selling Liquidity for $22.75 million. Hopefully they’ll cherish the memories from aboard this yacht, such as the time that actor Jim Belushi serenaded Kelly with “Happy Birthday” in the saloon. B: Christensen Shipyards, USA; N: Builder; H: Fiberglass; E: 2/1,800-hp DDC-MTUs

78. ROXANA • L: 154'0" Y: 1998
Roxana took in the sights in Venice, Italy, last year. Her owners hail from Tulsa, Oklahoma. B: Admiral Marine Works, USA; N: Donald Starkey/Builder; H: Fiberglass; E: 2/1,650-hp Caterpillars

79. CHARADE • L: 153'10" Y: 1990
Many of us yacht-watchers thought that Jody Allen, sister of Paul Allen (see nos. 1, 3, 14), received this Feadship from her brother a few years ago. But he actually still owns the yacht. Perhaps not for long, as Charade is for sale for $19 million. B: Feadship/De Vries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: H.W. De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/905-hp Caterpillars

Next page > 80-89 > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12

This article originally appeared in the October 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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