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Egg Harbor 50 Page 2

Exclusive: Egg Harbor 50 Sport Yacht By Capt. Patrick Sciacca — November 2005

Eggstatic!

Part 2: I concluded that the 50 is efficiently set up to run deep, right out of the box.

   
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• Egg Harbor 50 Deck Plan
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The 50 is constructed almost completely in house except for stitching of fabrics, and one of the impressive in-house pieces is the flying-bridge hard­top—specifically its welds. This is some of the cleanest work I’ve seen. It really isn’t just a structure for supporting a fiberglass top but an aesthetically pleasing and blended piece of equipage. It’s just as pleasing to the eye as the artistically curved aluminum flying-bridge ladder, which has a graceful and soft arch. Word has it that Egg Harbor Yachts’ owner, Dr. Ira Trocki, had a hand in its design. I guess this is where his plastic surgery background came into play, as everything about the 50 has a contoured look and feel, yet she maintains a rugged battlewagon appeal.

The high-end quality and look of the 50’s hardware is also evident in her high-gloss teak interior. Teak is this builder’s wood of choice, and when you see the cleanly finished, grain-matched cabinetry and bulkheads you understand why. Teak makes the saloon (with 7'2" headroom), galley, and dinette and the three staterooms and two heads below feel as comfy as your house.

For a personal touch in the port-side master stateroom, which has an astounding 8'3" headroom, there’s a hand-etched headboard mirror. This one had a leaping marlin with New York City as the backdrop, as this boat was going to Staten Island.

But like any boat, nothing’s perfect. Both great and not-so-great attributes are juxtaposed in the 50’s engine room. First, the great: fiberglass stringers that are 4 1/2 inches wide and stand about 20 1/2 inches high. Beefy. Next, spacious walk­around room for both engines, even with the standard 15-kW Westerbeke genset forward of the starboard engine. But with all this impressive space planning, the engine room lights were put right on centerline. While I had nearly standing headroom (remember, I’m 5'7"), damn if I didn’t clip almost all of them with my noggin. I say move the lighting fixtures off to the sides, corners, or anywhere but between the engines.

Aside from the ER, I felt her in-cockpit 67"Lx19 1/2"Wx16 1/2"D fishbox was small for a limit catch of Allison tuna and sizeable mahi-mahi and all the ice required for cooling these fish. Egg Harbor says it offers an optional transom “killbox,” and if you’re planning to use your boat for hardcore meat-fish-type offshore excursions, I’d go with it. Otherwise you’re set with the standard tackle center, tuna door, bait freezer, optional flying-bridge rocket launchers, and optional Lee double-spreader outriggers. I’d also go with a full-length bowrail. It’ll make transiting from the cockpit up the side decks much easier and, of course, safer.

I concluded that the 50 is efficiently set up to run deep, right out of the box. In addition, with some personal touches like the full bowrail, side-deck handholds, and that killbox, she’s ready for some serious bluewater, big-game service.

As I stood on the docks of the Egg Harbor Yacht Club and looked back at the 50, salt water on her sleek, bright-white hull reflected the high-noon sun. Gulls were still shrieking, and nearby boaters—you know, the real salty ones with the khaki hats with gold anchors in the middle and more rods than rod holders onboard—passed by and waved that hello that boaters do. And I thought to myself, yeah, the 50 may look modern and run fast, but she, like this town, is an old salt at heart.

Egg Harbor Yachts ( (609) 965-2300. www.eggharboryachts.com.

Next page > Egg Harbor 50 Sport Yacht Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the November 2005 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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