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Newburyport, Massachusetts Page 2

Cruising — January 2002
Cruising — January 2002
By Capt. Ken Kreisler


Newburyport, Massachusetts
Part 2: What To Do, Eateries
 


 More of this Feature
• Part 1: Newburyport, Massachusetts
• Part 2: Newburyport, Massachusetts continued
 
 Related Resources
• Cruising Index
• Cruising Editorial
• Cruising Resources
 
 From Other Guides
• New Jersey Shore Info
 
 Elsewhere on the Web
• Manasquan, NJ
 

WHAT TO DO
Newburyport is anything but a sleepy New England town:

• The area is a major flyby for migratory birds as well as a sanctuary for many native species. Grab your binoculars and take a self-guided tour at the Parker River National Wildlife Refuge (978) 465-5753 or a guided tour with the Massachusetts Audubon Society (978) 462-9998.

• Whale watching on Stellwagen Bank offers humpback, fin, and minke whales with Newburyport Whale Watch (978) 499-0832.

The Firehouse Center for the Performing Arts (978) 462-7336 presents music, stage productions, and art exhibits.

The Maudslay Art Center (978) 499-0050 is a natural outdoor amphitheater on what was once a private estate. Concerts include classical, pop, and big band.

• Museums include the Cushing House (978) 462-2681, Custom House Maritime Museum (978) 462-8681, and Lowell’s Boat Shop, c. 1793 (978) 388-0162.

EATERIES
Here are a few places where you can chow down:

• Chef William Griffin presides over the kitchen at the Bluewater Café (978) 462-1088. Try the Prince Edward Island mussels with white wine, garlic, and tomatoes over fettucini. Some locals consider the meatloaf, complete with mushroom gravy, red-skinned potatoes, and veggies, to be the world’s best.

• Want to eat aboard but don’t want to cook? The Carry Out Café (978) 499-2240 will prepare everything from a sandwich to a fine dining experience. Shepherd’s Pie, lasagne, Thai stir-fry, roast of the week, chicken, salads (Caesar, cobb, tuna, chicken, or garden), and the Chef'’s Daily Specials (lobster bisque, award-winning chili, and a pork chop stuffed with apple sausage) are among the many dishes.

• Everybody stops in at The Grog (978) 465-8008. In business since the end of the Civil War, when it was known as a "Ladies and Gents Eating and Oyster House," The Grog is a favorite meeting place for locals and visitors. Asian shrimp and original Buffalo chicken wings (from the recipe created at the Anchor Bar & Grill in Buffalo, New York) are served along with delicious soups, sandwiches, salads, and special entrees.

• Waterfront dining is available at Michael’s Harborside (978) 462-7785 and the Captain’s Quarters (978) 462-3397. Fresh seafood is the fare, and the patios are always packed.

• If you’ve got a yen for Italian food, try Giuseppe’s (978) 465-2225 or Ciro’s (978) 463-3335. Giuseppe Masia is both chef and owner of the first establishment, and his menu features more than 40 entrees and 13 different kinds of sandwiches in addition to soups and salads made from scratch every day. Upscale Ciro’s offers daily pasta, fish, and chicken specials and has outdoor seating overlooking Market Square.

• For elegant dining try Scandia (978) 462-6271. One of the restaurant’s signature dishes is the Salmon en Croute, stuffed with crab meat. And the kitchen will deliver to your boat.

• The building that houses the popular establishment named after its address, 10 Center Street (978) 463-3335 was built in 1790. The menu includes prime rib, coriander- and garlic-crusted scallops, bouillabaisse, and rack of lamb. The chocolate bread pudding and apple blueberry cobbler are favorites.

If you’ve enjoyed your cruise to Newburyport or have visited someplace you’d like PMY to mention in this column, drop us a line at Cruising, Power & Motoryacht, 260 Madison Ave., 8th Fl., New York, NY 10016. Fax: (917) 256-2282. e-mail: kkreisler@primediasi.com. No phone calls please.

To download a detailed navigational chart of this area, visit powerandmotoryacht.about.com and click the Charts link.

Previous page > Newburyport, Massachusetts, Part 1 > Page 1, 2

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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