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Boats

Gamefisherman 42 Express

Pelagic Warrior

This custom 42-footer was designed for one thing: taking on big game.

As you’d expect from a builder of sportfishing boats, Gamefisherman designs every vessel starting in the cockpit. The 42 Express’ has an insulated transom fishbox that’s five feet across and plumbed to an ice chipper that can make 600 pounds of shaved ice per day with a sensor to prevent over-filling. Other fishing necessities include a starboard freezer aft of the helm that can hold 100 pounds of bait and a prep station with a tackle locker opposite it. Aft of the Murray Brothers’ fighting chair, there’s a 50-gallon, lighted, in-sole livewell, and to attract fish, there are four Aqualuma underwater lights.

The bridge design keeps the focus on fishing. A Palm Beach-style helm provides nearly 360-degree visibility, and benchseating along either side features varnished teak trim; underneath these seats are rod lockers. A Bausch American tower and Rupp ‘riggers complete this 42-footer’s fishing package.

True to the boat’s fishing mission, the cabin was designed for times when the bite is off. There’s a dinette to starboard and bunks to port. There’s also a galley, ‘fridge, and hanging locker. The forward cabin features a full head with a Lumicor acrylic shower door.

The hull was also designed for offshore duty. It’s a modified-V with a sharp forefoot that warps out to 11 degrees at the transom. The boat is cold-molded using three layers of 3⁄8-inch-wide planks laid in a triple diagonal pattern. The two inside layers are Okoume; the outside is Philippine mahogany, epoxied, glassed, and painted with Awlgrip. The result is both strong and light, which is why Gamefisherman reports the 42 has a top end of 38.3 knots (44 mph) and a cruising speed of 33.2 knots (38.2 mph).

Here’s one more thing that tells you these guys are experienced fisherman: There’s no fuel gauge. You measure fuel level by dipping a teak dowel marked in 25-gallon increments. There’s no chance of running dry because of a faulty electric gauge. The fuel fill, under the cockpit step, is five inches in diameter (two inches is the norm) to accommodate commercial nozzles often found abroad. Just another little detail that shows aboard this 42 Express fishing comes first.

CONTACT: Gamefisherman (772) 220-4850

This article originally appeared in the June 2010 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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