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Boats

A Riviera Runabout

An offshoot of the Rodriquez Shipyard, which was founded in 1887, Morgan Yachts has been building Italian versions of classic U.S. workboats since 1991. Traditionally, downeast-style and commuter-inspired vessels over 45 feet have been the company’s mainstay, but now it’s venturing down to the 30-foot range.

The 33 Dinghy (an oxymoron for most of us) is intended for use as either a yacht tender or day boat, according to project manager Santo Bellistri. “Even the details have been made with this consideration,” he says. In order to be a more versatile yacht tender, she has a gently sloping sheerline that makes it easy to step onto any part of her gunwale. A sturdy teak handrail that wraps around the front of her helm area provides a solid handhold, and should there be any summer showers, Morgan has provided a cabin to keep everyone dry.

For dayboaters who want to make the occasional overnight excursion, the cabin’s V-berth converts into a double by way of a simple wooden insert. The head is beneath the center console, so to use it during the night, owners will have to leave the comfort of the cabin, although the journey is only about two feet. On such cruises the anchor will be readily accessible without detracting from the vessel’s sleek lines: It’s hidden beneath the teak deck, along with the anchor roller and windlass.

Both megayacht owners and picnickers will enjoy the oversize cockpit settee. The center section of the full-beam seat lifts out, allowing easy access to the optional teak swim platform. Below are the standard 190-hp Volvo Penta stern drives, which, according to Morgan, give the 33 Dinghy a top speed of 38 knots (43.7 mph) and a cruising speed of around 32 knots (36.8 mph). The settee is not available if you select either the fishing package or the twin 250-hp Yamaha outboards with which the top speed is said to be 45 knots and the cruising speed 35 knots.

The first 33 is slated to launch late this summer.

The V-berth converts to a double with the help of a wooden insert.

This article originally appeared in the May 2009 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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