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FYI: April 2003

FYI — April 2003
By Brad Dunn
   
 
 More of this Feature
• Part 1: WTC, Things We Like, and more
• Part 2: A Word With.., and more

 Related Resources
• News/FYI Index

World Trade Center Reincarnated
To honor those who died in the terrorist attacks of September 11, the Navy will begin building a new warship this summer named the USS New York, and its hull will be partially constructed of steel salvaged from Ground Zero.

On Christmas Day, more than 25 tons of scrap steel from the World Trade Center were loaded onto trucks at the Staten Island Fresh Kills Landfill, where the wreckage had been sorted and stored. The steel was transported to Northrop Grumman in Pascagoula, Mississippi, which will incorporate it into a 684-foot, San Antonio-class assault ship that can carry up to 1,200 people.

Of the more than 25 tons of steel that naval engineers decided to use for the project, almost 20 tons came from a single beam about 20 feet long. Recovery crews believe the beam was part of the south tower, which was the second building to be struck by an airliner but the first to collapse.

According to Northrop Grumman, if the steel meets specifications, it will be melted down and incorporated into the USS New York’s cutwater, the leading edge of the bow that slices through the water.

Because Navy policy is that state names can only be applied to submarines, New York Governor George Pataki (far left, next to New York mayor Michael Bloomberg and former mayor Rudy Giuliani) had to get special authorization from top Navy officials to name the new vessel after the state that lost the most lives during the attacks. “The USS New York... will ensure that the world never forgets the evil attacks of September 11 and the course and strength New Yorkers showed in response to terror,” he says.

The $800 million warship is slated for active duty in 2007.

Things We Like
For PMY managing editor Eileen Mansfield, the highlight of a trip to the IGFA Fishing Hall of Fame was snagging a virtual marlin in this interactive fishing simulator. Armed with a real reel and rod, she felt tugs on the line, wrestled with her foe, and then netted him—all from a chair that responded perfectly to her movements as well as the images on the screen. In addition to marlin, visitors can fish for sailfish, bass, tarpon, or trout.

Best of all, with its reset button, it’s a true catch-and-release program. 

16,000
The number of pounds per square inch of water pressure you’d feel if you found yourself at the bottom of the Pacific Ocean. 

April Calendar
4-7. The Boat Show in Pensacola, Florida. (251) 478-7469. www.gulfcoastshows.com.
10-13. The Suncoast Boat Show in Sarasota, Florida. (800) 940-7642. www.showmanagement.com.
10-13. The Orange County Boat Show in Anaheim, California. (714) 633-7581. www.scma.com.
11-14. The Canton Boat Show in Baltimore, Maryland. (410) 238-0484. www.boatshowsonline.com.
24-27. The Long Island In-Water Boat Show in Freeport, New York. (631) 691-7050. www.nymta.com.

Next page > A Word With..., and more > Page 1, 2

This article originally appeared in the March 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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