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Party Doll Page 2

Trinity Yachts’ Chevy Toy By Diane M. Byrne — February 2004

Party Doll

Part 2: Some of the yacht’s features dually benefit the guests and crew.
   
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• Part 1: Chevy Toy
• Part 2: Chevy Toy
• Chevy Toy Specs
• Chevy Toy Deck Plans
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Exterior areas of Chevy Toy also benefit from some refinements. Any charter yacht intending to ply warm climates needs to have an abundance of outdoor relaxation space as well as alfresco dining spots, and Chevy Toy delivers on both accords. The sundeck is aptly named, featuring chaise lounges that can be rearranged as well as a Jacuzzi fully forward, flanked by raised sunpads. Should the sun prove too intense, the chaise lounges can be shaded by a bimini top that attaches to the radar arch and removable stainless steel poles. Anyone wishing to take the action closer to the water—or on land—can choose from the handful of toys deployed from here. Two PWCs and a 17-foot RIB are stowed on the sundeck, and when Reed is aboard, two shiny silver Vespa scooters join them. Chevy Toy also tows an Intrepid in the 30-foot range.

As for alfresco dining spots, the table on the teak-laid aft deck handily accommodates 12 or more people, and a bar just steps away keeps the libations flowing. Up on the sundeck, a U-shape bar lies amidships, allowing guests to cool off in comfort there or on one of the lounges or sunpads previously mentioned.

Interestingly, some of the yacht’s features dually benefit the guests and crew. One example is the placement of full-size mooring bits on the swim platform. If you’ve seen a yacht Med-moored, you may have seen how crossed stern lines can interfere with walking along the passarelle when it’s deployed. Trinity addressed this issue aboard Chevy Toy by installing full-size mooring bits on the swim platform, allowing the stern lines to extend down and therefore cross each other below the passarelle.

Another good example of the dual benefit is the configuration of the seating area aft on the main deck. The long seat is slightly forward of the traditional placement, giving guests some extra shade due to the overhang of the deck above and, even better, positioning the cushions forward of the drip edge of the overhang when the crew washes down Chevy Toy. And the extra space behind the seat allows the crew to work lines while the yacht is pulling into or out of port without concern for guests getting in the way.

As Smith is fond of saying, “If you’ve got a good crew, you’re yachting; if you’ve got a bad crew, you’re boating.” Chevy Toy further embraces the concept by providing the captain with a walkaround queen-berth stateroom just aft of the pilothouse and the engineer with an equally good-size stateroom to port off the engine room. Steps away from the engineer’s cabin are a huge workbench and tool drawers, plus the Atlas TecPower shorepower system and breaker panels. Four additional crew are accommodated in two staterooms.

Even the chef’s daily tasks were given careful consideration aboard this 142-footer. The main cooking area is forward and to port, allowing work to continue here uninterrupted while the stewardesses flow in and out through the butler’s pantry just aft and the other entrance to the galley—an unusual but smart request made by Reed—off the starboard hallway.

As we were going to press, Chevy Toy was embarking on her first full charter season in the Caribbean, where she’s available for $125,000 per week. Given the repeat business her 118-foot predecessor enjoyed, she’s poised to become a darling of the fleet. It won’t happen overnight—even Buddy Knox had to wait a few weeks for “Party Doll” to hit number one. But just as the rockabilly singer from tiny Happy, Texas, went on to sell more than 10 million copies of his single worldwide, Reed will likely see his doll become the life of the party, too.

Trinity Yachts Phone: (504) 283-40505. www.trinityyachts.com.

Next page > Chevy Toy Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This article originally appeared in the January 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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