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Jewel of the Adriatic Page 2

Custom Line 112 By Alan Harper — February 2004

Jewel of the Adriatic

Part 2: Interior fit-out quality is top-notch.
   
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• Part 1: Custom Line 112
• Part 2: Custom Line 112
• Custom Line 112 Specs
• Custom Line 112 Deck Plans
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The owner’s cabin is forward on the main deck, behind those big windows, and benefits from terrific views and lots of daylight. This is obviously where a cruising owner would want to be, but if you were building a 112 with charter in mind, it could alternatively be fitted out as a big, airy dining room, leaving a vast, uncluttered saloon aft. Below, Blue Diamond has two en suite double guest cabins forward and a giant VIP suite amidships, which easily would be big enough to serve as a palatial owner’s suite should you decide to take the dining room option. A fourth guest cabin can also be created to give two twins (see the deck plans), but this squeezes the space available in the bow for crew accommodation.

Interior fit-out quality is top-notch. The joinery throughout is American cherry with walnut tops and satin varnish—a safe bet for a stock boat and one that suits Blue Diamond admirably. There are a couple of more questionable customizing decisions, however, most notably the doors on each side of the owner’s central bathtub, which are made of tinted glass, making it possible for the occupants of the his and her heads to wave to each other, should they be feeling especially sociable. The alternate arrangement for the master shown in the deck plans on page 158 avoids this.

The extended upper deck, which does so much to emphasize the 112’s sleek looks, is a practical area, with a big sofa, several acres of sunbathing area around the hot tub, and forward-facing seats on both sides of the companionway. The forward section can be shaded by a furling bimini top, sturdy enough to be used when underway, which makes the upper helm station and the surrounding seating area practical for guests on long passages.

These wide-open spaces are matched by similar surprising generosity in the engine room. The standard motors are 2,775-hp MTU V12s, which are pretty big lumps. Nevertheless they luxuriate in a massive engine room, reached down a concealed companionway on the starboard side of the cockpit. Propeller tunnels reduce the shaft angle and allow the V-12s to sit flat, and with 6'9" of headroom, this area feels especially spacious and uncluttered. And there is no suggestion that the tender garage—itself a good size, with ample space for a 13-foot jet RIB and a PWC—has been allowed to rob space from the machinery. (There’s also a small garage located forward, under a large hatch on the main deck.)

While a cruising yacht ought to have a contented engineer, as this one will, it should certainly have a happy chef as well—but here the 112’s sleek profile seems to have presented her designers with an insurmountable problem. The low-level wheelhouse makes those sporty looks possible, but unfortunately the galley is right underneath—and there’s just 4'6" of clearance between the main deck and the wheelhouse floor well. There’s plenty of headroom in the L-shape walkway around the edge of it, but only around 16 inches above the galley worktops, which makes things awkward for anyone of average height because you can’t lean over your work.

Still, fast, long-range cruising in supreme comfort is what the Custom Line 112 is all about, and if that means giving the cook a little extra time off every now and then, so be it—you find good restaurants in surprising places these days. From Ancona it’s barely 80 miles across the Adriatic to the spectacular coastline of Croatia. We could have been comparing menus in the medieval streets of Zadar in little more than three hours.

MarineMax Phone: (727) 531-1700. www.customline-yacht.com.

Next page > Custom Line 112 Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This article originally appeared in the January 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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