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Custom Line Navetta 30 Page 2

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Custom Line Navetta 30 — By Diane M. Byrne — May 2002

Ship Shape
Part 2: Salty Appeal
   
 
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• Part 1: Navetta 30
• Part 2: Navetta 30 continued
• Navetta 30 Specs
• Navetta 30 Deck Plans
• Navetta 30 Photo Gallery


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Stylistically, the deckhouse is the first obvious nod to the Navetta's roots. International Project Studio, headed by naval architect Gianni Zuccon, places it forward and fully encloses it with large, square windows, more like that of a commercial ship--and much different than the open-air flying bridges of other Custom Line craft. It's not quite all business, though, because a ladder amidships at its base yields access to a private, small sundeck on its roof. This part of the superstructure is designed so that you'd never know a person was up there unless you climbed the ladder.

Another example of how Custom Line unobtrusively blends distinctly yacht-oriented features into the design is the all-teak swim platform. It doesn't protrude far or give the appearance of being tacked onto the transom; rather, it wraps around ever so subtly to blend into the hull sides just above the waterline.

While most of the interior reflects yacht-like traits, there are a handful of features that lend salty appeal. For example, large, square windows line the main deck. An all-wood planked sole--not wall-to-wall carpeting--runs through the saloon and dining area and even extends into the galley. A staircase to starboard in the saloon that is faced and topped with more wood leads down to the guest accommodations and up to the pilothouse. The steps are steep, much like those of a converted vessel; Custom Line was wise to include a handrail (in matching wood, of course).

While Custom Line offers owners a choice of woods and other soft goods, most of the five Navetta 30s that are currently under construction feature an appearance reminiscent of a bygone era rather than the highly lacquered, modern flourish we've all come to expect of Italian yards. Hull #1, shown here, best exemplifies the classic appeal, featuring satin-finished mahogany and coffered overheads.

Like the rest of the luxury yachts from Custom Line, the Navetta 30 permits owners to tailor space planning. It's easy to imagine many of them opting to have the owner's suite on the same level as the saloon, as was done on Sunshine of Spain, since this has become a growing trend on megayachts smaller than 150 feet LOA. Thanks to this arrangement above deck, the lower deck handily accommodates four guest staterooms, comprised of a full-beam VIP cabin amidships, two staterooms featuring twin beds (with ever-convenient pullman berths also available) just forward to either side of a foyer, and a double cabin forward of that. In an interesting twist for a yacht just over 100 feet LOA, Sunshine of Spain features a sauna in place of one of the two twin staterooms below.

Placing the owner's suite on deck does have a drawback, however. It limits space aft in the dining area and saloon--rooms sure to be centers of activity--as well as in the galley, so the alternate arrangement Custom Line offers might get a better reception among some prospective buyers. Instead of having a full-beam VIP cabin below decks, owners can turn that room into their private retreat and have the remaining three cabins house their guests.

Even though the Navetta is remarkably different from any other Custom Line yacht, the philosophy behind her creation is the same: comfort, polish, and pleasing lines. The yard is striving to prove that the seemingly incongruous concepts of shippy styling and luxury luster can blend.

Just don't tell that to the antagonists on opposite sides of the exploration-yacht argument; they just might catch on.

Custom Line Phone: (39) 071 201 754. Fax: (39) 071 200 008. www.customline-yacht.com.

Ferretti of America Phone: (305) 634-6160. Fax: (305) 634-6161.

Next page > Navetta 30 Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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