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America's 200 Largest Yachts 2002 Page 6

America’s 200 Largest Yachts - 41-50
America’s 200 Largest Yachts

41-50: Illusion to Shandor

By Diane M. Byrne

   

43. Blue Moon
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41. ILLUSION | L: 167'0" Y: 1983
Many charter yachts these days have their own Web sites, and Illusion is no exception. By logging on to www.yachtillusion.com, you'll learn she totes a wide variety of fun watertoys, such as windsurfers, wakeboards, and kayaks, and also that her chef wields a mean knife (the lobster sashimi with beluga caviar on the sample menu sounds like it's to die for!). But one thing you won't learn is that there are two owners, one of whom heads a Hollywood talent agency and the other who runs a major airline. B: Feadship/Royal Van Lent Shipyard, Holland; N: H.W. De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,125-hp Caterpillars

42. LAZY Z | L: 165'8" Y: 1998
Anyone for volleyball? Yes, you read that right: Lazy Z has the equipment--as well as other games--ready to be set up on the beach of your choice if you're a charterer onboard. But sometimes people just want to relax on their vacations, just like what one group did during the Monaco Grand Prix. We hear they just enjoyed the yacht, rather than throwing a lavish party like some other race attendees. B: Oceanco, South Africa; N: Richard Hein/The "A" Group Monte Carlo SAM; H: Steel; E: 2/1,714-hp MTUs

43. BLUE MOON | L: 165'0" Y: 2000
If you're a fan of the A&E cable channel, then you may have seen Blue Moon's big television debut on Joan Lunden's show earlier this year. Lunden and the film crew were treated to a full tour of the yacht's intimate relaxation spaces, where upwards of three generations of the owner's family gather and rooms are adorned with tropical murals. As you'd expect, Lunden was impressed. The yacht was commissioned by a gentleman who enjoys Bahamian cruising and who was introduced to Feadships more than a decade ago when he chartered the popular September Blue. B: Feadship/Royal Van Lent Shipyard, Holland; N: H.W. De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Aluminum; E: 2/1,500-hp Caterpillars

44. POTOMAC | L: 165'0" Y: 1934/1995
Built as the U.S. Coast Guard cutter Electra, this vessel was later converted to serve as the Presidential yacht for FDR. The "Floating White House," as she was nicknamed, was used by him until his death in 1945. At least one private individual maintained the yacht after that, but all did not go well, since in 1980 she was seized by U.S. Customs for her role as a front for drug smugglers in San Francisco. A few years later she sank in San Francisco Bay off Treasure Island. Thankfully the Navy refloated her days after the accident, and the Port of Oakland in California purchased her for just $15,000. The Port of Oakland spearheaded a $5 million restoration with the assitance of maritime experts and volunteers. It took 12 years, but Potomac now serves as an active memorial to FDR and is an official National Historic Landmark. She's available for tours and private cruises. B: Manitowoc Shipbuilding, USA; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: unknown

45. AURORA B | L: 164'0" Y: 1992
Aurora B employs liberal use of dark paneling inside. Her owner is protective of his privacy, which makes finding out details about the yacht difficult, although you may see her in Florida or the Caribbean. B: Feadship/DeVries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: H.W. De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,450-hp Caterpillars

46. IROQUOIS | L: 164'0" Y: 1998
We've met big music fans, but they pale in comparison to the owner of Iroquois. On the boat deck there's an expanse of high-tech equipment for managing a fully computerized central music system that can be operated from various rooms onboard. We also hear that the owner is a baseball fan, having a vested interest in an East Coast team (although it's too bad that team has absolutely no chance of ever winning a World Series--not that we're biased Yankees fans or anything...). B: Feadship/DeVries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,370-hp Caterpillars

47. TEDDY | L: 164'0" Y: 1997
One of the first yachts to be built to comply with the MCA safety rules, she was launched as Tigre d'Or for an owner who has since gone on to commission a few similar-named vessels from Amels. An American bought this one two years ago. B: Amels, Holland; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: unknown

48. INVADER | L: 163'7" Y: 1999
Three California natives with experience in the broadcast business share ownership of Invader. One of them also owns a Boeing 727, which they used to make trips to the yard while the yacht was under construction. They're certainly enjoying the extra space this yacht affords over the one they used for many years previously, an 85-footer--and we're sure their faithful sidekick Jake, an Alaskan malamute, enjoys the extra space, too. B: Codecasa, Italy; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/2,200-hp Caterpillars

49. PRINCESA VALENTINA | L: 163'4" Y: 1993
Currently halfway through her second circumnavigation, Princesa Valentina departed Fort Lauderdale for St. Petersburg (as in Russia) in late May. On her previous world cruise, stops included Australia and Thailand. B: Oceanco, South Africa/Holland; N: Gerhard Gilgenast; H: Steel; E: 2/1,530-hp MTUs

50. SHANDOR | L: 162'10" Y: 1986/1994
One of America's favorite former talk-show hosts, Merv Griffin, sold this yacht (which he named The Griff) to another American who has her available for charter. She's expected to be in the Caribbean this winter and will be available for between $133,000 and $147,000 per week. Hopefully the new owner has retained the onboard screening room. B: Fr. Schweers, Germany; N: Gerhard Gilgenast; H: Steel; E: 1/2,300-hp Krupp MAKs

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This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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