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America's 200 Largest Yachts 2002 Page 4

America’s 200 Largest Yachts - 21-30
America’s 200 Largest Yachts

21-30: Barbara Jean to Big Eagle

By Diane M. Byrne

   

21. Barbara Jean
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21. BARBARA JEAN | L: 185'3" Y: 2001
There's an abundance of rich Honduras mahogany throughout this yacht's various rooms, but the real eye-catcher is the decor in the main entrance. The initials B and J are interlaced in a compass rose design in the carpeting. The entrance is made even more grand by a staircase flanked by mirrored alcoves in which marble bases support two three-foot-high statues of Poseidon and his wife Amphitrite. Below them, two hand-carved gilded eagles look across the room at one another. B: Feadship/De Vries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,500-hp Caterpillars

22. LADY J | L: 185'0" Y: 1976
Currently in Washington State, Lady J is a global cruiser with seven staterooms. In recent years she was known as Quest and used as a base for a documentary crew for a film they were doing about the environment. The yacht is currently for sale for $3.9 million. Among her unusual features: nearly full-height, slanted oval windows aft on the upper deck that spill light into the master stateroom. B: Quality Shipyard, USA; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/1,760-hp Wartsila Nohab Polars

23. PANGAEA | L: 184'0" Y: 1999
Teak paneling underscores the nautical nature of this globetrotter. The current owner purchased her from the individual who recently took delivery of Big Roi (see no. 8). "Pangaea" is the same name given to all of the continents when they were one giant land mass. B: Halter Marine, USA; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/1,000-hp Caterpillars

24. HUNTRESS | L: 180'5" Y: 1997
Sleek and modern are good descriptions for this yacht, which is notable for having six vertical oval windows that extend down to the guest accommodations on the lower deck. As you'd expect of any proper charter yacht, a helicopter for ferrying guests to and fro can land on her uppermost deck; in this case, hydraulics help convert the sundeck into the landing pad. She charters for $240,000 per week. B: Feadship/De Vries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,280-hp Caterpillars

25. PLATINUM | L: 179'4" Y: 1962
Platinum is famed for toting two helicopters (yes, two). Residents of the Keys are quite familiar with her, as she spends a good deal of her time there, but she also cruises in her owner's home region of New England. A recent modification to her aft sections permits guests to use a spiral staircase to reach the swim platform. B: Fr. Lürssen Werft, Germany; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/2,130-hp MTUs

26. KATHARINE | L: 177'0" Y: 2001
If only economic recoveries moved as fast: A few months after this yacht was delivered as Seahawk late last year, she was sold. It's not that her original owner, Jim Mattei, who counts the Checkers fast-food chain among his various business interests over the years, was unhappy. Rather, he decided he'd like a larger yacht; we're told he's placed an order for a 205-footer with Trinity Yachts. The couple who purchased this yacht previously owned a 132-foot Trident named Katharine. They're certainly enjoying the extra space afforded by their new cruiser, having cruised from Sardinia to the South of France this summer and having hosted a cocktail party in Monaco for about 100 guests. Want to learn about the yacht's latest cruise, which should be taking place in the Bahamas this month? Check out the Web site www.yachtkatharine.net. B: Trinity Yachts, USA; N: Builder; H: Aluminum; E: 2/2,000-hp MTU-DDCs

27. LITTLE SIS | L: 175'6" Y: 1994
New carpeting, two new PWC, and upgraded equipment are probably just a few of the reasons why a buyer was attracted to this yacht earlier this year. Then known as Little Sis, she sold in April; her selling agent hadn't returned our call by presstime, so we don't know her new name. One of her outstanding features is the set of "blinds" overhead on her sundeck--instead of employing a hardtop or bimini, the yacht features louvered panels that can be adjusted to let sun shine in or keep the area shaded. B: Oceanfast, Australia; N: Jon Bannenberg/Phil Curran; H: Aluminum; E: 2/2,750-hp MTUs

28. KISSES | L: 175'0" Y: 2000
While most people naturally wonder who owns a megayacht that they see, people in Nantucket were buzzing about the identity of this yacht's owners this summer due to the intriguing name. Could it have something to do with candy, they wondered? Maybe, but they'll just have to keep guessing, as the owners like to keep things quiet. B: Feadship/De Vries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,360-hp Caterpillars

29. ICE BEAR | L: 173'0" Y: 1988
Here's another yacht that had people buzzing this summer, this time in Alaska, and the news wasn't good. The captain, rumored to be a real disciplinarian, reportedly had the crew wiping down the vessel every day, even in the rain. One incredulous boater we know became a believer when he saw a crew member out in the pouring rain, chamois in hand. B: Feadship/De Vries Scheepsbouw, Holland; N: H.W. De Voogt Naval Architects; H: Steel; E: 2/1,000-hp Caterpillars

30. BIG EAGLE | L: 172'0" Y: 1980
Big Eagle was among the many yachts in Cannes for the annual film festival this past spring. The surroundings and the yacht's Asian-influenced decor made for quite a combination. Having finished up her summer in the Med, during which she also made stops in Porto Cervo and Portofino, she's heading to the Bahamas and perhaps the Caribbean for the winter, where she'll be available for charter for $85,000 per week. B: Mei Shipyard, Japan; N: Builder; H: Steel; E: 2/900-hp Detroit Diesels

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This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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