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Megayachts

America's 200 Largest Yachts 2002

Our annual tribute to the largest American-owned yachts, with a twist.

Every November for 17 years we've been chronicling the largest yachts to grace the water, especially those owned by our very own neighbors (albeit in much larger homes) here in the US of A. If you've been a faithful reader of this exclusive annual listing, then you've no doubt noticed something is different about this year's edition: We've changed it from "America's 200 Largest Yachts" to "America's 100 Largest Yachts."

The change was necessary for a number of reasons. A major one is the difficulty in accurately tracking such a large number of yachts. When we first published this roster in 1985, we listed only 50. In 1987 we doubled it to 100, and in 1990 we doubled it again. But the past few years have taught us that sometimes double is just double trouble. Despite our best efforts to obtain new information on where these yachts have been and who sold them to whom, for example, sometimes we've come up empty. And there's nothing more frustrating to yacht-chroniclers--and yacht-watchers, too--than failing to have the most up-to-date and interesting information.

Another reason is aesthetics: We want to include more photos. Even the most jaded among you (and us) has to admit that these yachts are downright amazing to look at. So instead of just saying that Cakewalk has a model ship in her saloon or that Katana has a readily recognizable Japanese theme, we now have the space to show you.

But even though we shortened the list, we didn't want the 100 yachts that will no longer be gracing this section to be suddenly cast adrift. So we decided to give them a proper sendoff on our Web site www.powerandmotoryacht.com, where you'll find descriptions and some photos of numbers 101 through 200.

Both here and online, the listing uses the following code: L=length, Y=year launched (where two dates are given, the second is a refit date), B=builder, N=naval architect, H=hull material, and E=engines. New launches are highlighted in blue.

And now, without further ado, turn the page to meet your neighbors (albeit ones who need much bigger docks).

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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