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Tiara 4100 Open - Second Time Around

Tiara 4100 OpenMission Accomplished

The Tiara 4100 Open meets the needs of both the angler and cruiser with aplomb.

Perhaps the ultimate challenge for a production boat manufacturer is to build a single model that both meets the needs of the rabid offshore angler and serious cruiser. A handful of builders have satisfied this mission, while others simply add a couple of rod holders and an ill-placed rocket launcher and label the boat a sportfisherman. Over the years Tiara Yachts of Holland, Michigan, has developed platforms with a perfect balance; the 4100 Open shown here is a fine example of its “the best of both worlds” approach.  

Judge John DiNoto, a cruiser from Long Island, New York, is the proud owner of a 2000 4100 Open, Scales of Just Us. His son Robert, the boat’s previous owner, is an avid fisherman. The transformation from sportfisher to cruiser was seamless; the black-and-gold outriggers were removed (the mounts inconspicuously remain on the cabin sides), a factory swim platform and additional cockpit canvas were added and that’s about all she needed.

Click here to read the original boat test from Power & Motoryacht's April 1996 issue.Stability and seakeeping are important to both market segments and the DiNotos agree on the stellar performance of this modified-V hull. The 28,000-pound express has proven to easily handle the stiff afternoon southwesterly breezes on Long Island Sound as well as nasty head seas. Scales of Just Us has logged hundreds of hours trolling the canyons off the Northeast coast and her crew has won multiple tournaments. “Whether I was three feet from the dock or 120 miles off the beach, I knew I was getting home,” said the younger DiNoto.  

The 435-hp Caterpillar 3208 diesels on Scales of Just Us won’t produce breakneck speeds, but economically push the nearly 15-foot-wide express to a 22-knot cruise. What’s more, her 524-gallon fuel capacity appeals to both segments by offering significant cruising range. 

The 4100 Open’s amenities and layout are proven crowd-pleasers. The cockpit is tremendous. For the last five seasons the cockpit of Scales of Just Us has entertained guests on plushly padded chairs and the aft folding bench seat where a cavernous polyurethane fish box once sat. The heavily hinged transom door to starboard provides guests easy access to marina docks, rather than its past duties of allowing the crew to drag thumping yellowfin tuna through it. A stainless steel Magma grill sits in the Lee swivel rod holder where an 80-pound-class gold Penn reel once lived.

An ergonomic helm for the captain. Click for larger image.The raised, air-conditioned helm deck is three steps up from the cockpit, making for remarkable lines of sight both fore and aft. An L-shaped settee is on the centerline. Next to the saloon door is a chart area with built-in drink holders. An additional sink (there’s also a cockpit bait station with sink) is behind the helm seat. The real estate for electronics is ample. Obviously electronics have changed drastically in a decade, but this helm design will allow owners to update their package easily with today’s multifunction displays. 

Aboard Scales of Just Us the half-tower is well supported and in my opinion, nicely overbuilt. Its heavy supports haven’t weakened over their dozen or so years, nor have they pitted thanks to diligent care. The cabin sides exhibit no gelcoat spider-cracking near the tower mounts (or anywhere else for that matter), a sign of good fiberglass layup as well as that the tower legs weren’t overtightened and were mounted correctly with sufficient backing plates.

Engine-room access is through a large rectangular day hatch in the helm-deck sole or a cockpit door. If blindfolded and led into the space, one would be hard-pressed to say the design is not a current model.

The dinette converts to a guest berth. Click for larger imagesThis 4100 Open has a light wood interior and the ports provide adequate ambient light. The wide beam gives the saloon room for a large dinette that converts to upper and lower berths and a galley with a full-size refrigerator, microwave, and two-burner cooktop. 

Tiara’s hull doesn’t taper drastically as it continues towards the bow. The master stateroom with centerline berth is forward and benefits from this design. There is a single head aboard with a large stall shower. 

The engine room offers great access. Click for larger image.When looking at a used boat, keep in mind her pedigree. Cruisers should look for one that hasn’t been tricked out with the latest fishing gear and a tower. On the other hand anglers can take a cruiser and make the necessary upgrades. Don’t write off a boat that’s “been fished.” It’s all about the care and maintenance past owners have dedicated to their pride and joy. But if it smells like fish, well, that’s another story...

This article originally appeared in the August 2012 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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