How to read a classification

I suppose you all have come across a classification of a yacht and read it without really understanding all the details. Normally you think it must be a good thing if a yacht is classified by one of the leading classification societes like Lloyd's, ABS or Bureau Veritas.

Why have a yacht classified? Traditionally it has been of importance for the insurances - that's how classification of ships started originally. And of course the yacht will have a higher perceived value and will be more easy to sell on the market when that day comes. Finally a classification is much appreciated by the shipping registry of the flag state speeding up the registry procedure.


Let's look at a typical Lloyd's classification of a yacht. It can read:

+100A1, SSC Yacht (P) Mono G6, LMC, CCS, UMS

+ should be a "Maltese cross symbol" and means that the ship was built under special survey

100 means it is a steel ship ("will last 100 years") fit for sea-going service

A means the ship has been built into class in accordance with Lloyd's Register's Rules and Regulations, the ship is maintained in good and efficient condition

1 means that the ship has onboard anchoring and mooring equipment in good and efficient condition

SSC means Special Service Craft which is the category into which the ship has been classified by Lloyd's

Yacht Mono is the type of Special Service Craft, mono-hulled yacht

(P) means that the yacht is built in accordance with SOLAS 1974 for subdivision and fire protection, detection and extinction in passenger ships not carrying more than 36 passengers

G6 means Service Group 6, the yacht has no service area restriction and is "ocean going".

LMC is Lloyd's Machinery Certificate meaning that the machinery has been
installed and tested under Lloyd's special survey

CCS means Centralized Control Station, the control enginering equipment has been arranged, installed and tested in accordance to Lloyd's rules. The yacht may be operated with continous supervision from a centralized control station, normally the wheelhouse.

UMS means Unmanned Machinery Space. The control engineering equipment has been arranged, installed and tested in accordance with Lloyd's rules permitting the craft to be operated with the machinery spaces unattended.




Modified by Andy Lindy at 5:27 PM 7/19/2004