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Red Hot

Azimut 62S By Alan Harper — June 2006

Red Hot

A noted Italian builder designs one racy, head-turning, sleek sport cruiser.

   
Courtesy of Azimut
 More of this Feature

• Azimut 62S
• Azimut 62S Part 2
• Azimut 62S Specs
• Azimut 62S Deck Plan
• Azimut 62S Acceleration Curve
• Azimut 62S Photo Gallery

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Azimut has been working hard filling the gaps in its red range. The famous 68S (“It’s Hip to Be Square,” September 2004), which seemed such a radical departure for a builder of safe, sensible, white flying-bridge cruisers and motoryachts, was followed pretty quickly by the surface-drive-equipped 86S (“A Vision Realized,” November 2005) which was, if anything, even more off the wall.

A short breathing space followed (while the company got busy reinventing crucial areas of its flying-bridge range), and then at the Genoa boat show last autumn not one but two new red ones were launched: a great-looking little 43S with IPS drives, and this one, the best of the lot.

Radical red sports machines were never what Azimut was about, but having made the decision to jump into this new sector, it’s done it with great gusto and enthusiasm. It helps of course that the builder had the good sense to stay with its regular design team of Carlo Galeazzi and Stefano Righini, who bring a wealth of experience to the job as well as some of the most high-octane talent to be found anywhere in the world. Because while a white, family flying-bridge cruiser can look like a Volvo and still sell, a sportboat has a duty to look great.

A difference in hull length of just seven feet between this new model and the 68S might seem marginal, but the 62S is not just a scaled-down version of her bigger sister: She’s a two-cabin boat. That’s right—62 feet LOA, and no tiny third cabin that fills up as soon as you stand in the doorway and your kids refuse to sleep in, which therefore ends up full of cockpit cushions and spare fenders because it doesn’t seem to be any good for anything else. It’s a risky strategy.

No, instead of the joke third cabin, this boat has a second saloon, a home cinema, a secluded study for navigation planning, and a comfortable lounging area, where you can sprawl on a sofa and enjoy a pre-dinner glass of Sancerre while offering unhelpful suggestions to the cook in the galley opposite.

Not all of these additional features are available at the same time, of course, because they’re all in the same area. And for want of a generic term to describe what is effectively a unique feature, we’ll call this area the lower saloon, which you discover as you go forward down the companionway from the cockpit. There on the port side, facing the galley, which can be closed off behind a sliding door, sit a sofa and an armchair, with a coffee table. (That’s for the Sancerre.) There is also a large screen, onto which the boat’s entertainment system can project the TV or any DVD you might have onboard. (That’s your home cinema.) And since the boat’s entertainment system is driven by a powerful integrated PC, you can also sit down here with your optional Raymarine remote keyboard and call up the plotter and radar displays as well as any of the other data displayed on the instruments at the helm.

So this lower saloon is a tremendously versatile area, but above all it’s comfortable. You want to sit there. And it’s right at the center of things: A few steps from the helm, it is the interface between the 62S’ upper and lower decks. Just forward lies the en suite VIP cabin, with a clever pair of hinged V-berths that slide together and substantial side windows, which combine with the overhead hatch to flood the space with light.


Next page > Azimut 62S: Part 2 > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the July 2006 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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