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Boats

The Hidden Tradition

Although the builder True North has only been around since 1999, its parent company, Pearson Composites, has a heritage that stretches back 48 years. (Sailing enthusiasts will recognize it as the manufacturer of J-series boats, one of the standard classes in competitive racing.) But True North's relatively recent arrival on the scene doesn't prevent it from harkening from the same traditions. Her Downeast styling cues, plumb bow, and tumblehome after sections give her a look reminiscent of an earlier era, while an interior of handcrafted and varnished cherry or teak adds a touch of New England charm.

True North 47

Yet the 47's classical appearance belies a slew of modern technology integrated within. The 47 is the first True North with pod drives, a pair of 435-hp D6 IPS 600 diesels tucked into the engine space beneath the cockpit. Her modified-V hull, with 22 degrees of midship deadrise and 17 degrees aft, should reach a top speed of 30 knots and cruise at 26 knots with this package, according to the builder. Such performance is due, in part, to her construction: True North enlists SCRIMP resin-infusion in both the hull and deck then bonds the two together with a shoebox-style joint secured by methacrylate adhesive. SCRIMP allows the uniform penetration of resin into the fibers of the triaxial and unidirectional E-glass and end-grain balsa coring. This virtually eliminates voids, strengthening the laminate while minimizing weight (her light-load displacement is 30,000 pounds) compared to hand-laid fiberglass of the same thickness.

True North is offering two versions of the 47: an express and a flying bridge. "We wanted to make [the 47] versatile for different cruising regiments," says chief designer Clive Dent. A 4-kW raydome graces the top of each vessel's radar mast; its height keeps the radar's 12.5-degree downward sweep clear of blind spots in the vertical plane, so you'll able to find your way home no matter where you cruise—even if it's in thick New England fog.

For more information on Pearson Composites' True North, including contact information,click here.

This article originally appeared in the February 2009 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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