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Boats

Burger 43-Meter

One of the most important parameters in yacht design is the intended maximum speed. If the hull is meant to be capable of exceeding its theoretical hull speed, then it generally has a hard chine, to make the water separate from the hull at speed, and flatter sections near the stern to keep the vessel from squatting in her own wake. But if design speed is less than or equal to hull speed, then she can have finer bow and stern sections and fuller sections in the midbody (like a canoe) to glide with ease.

Burger 43-Meter

For techies, hull speed (in knots) is estimated by taking 1.34 times the square root of waterline length (in feet); for the Burger 43-meter, with a 125-foot waterline length, it's about 15 knots. Not coincidentally, that's the top speed she's designed to attain, and she'll cruise efficiently at about 90 percent of it, or about 13 knots, with relatively modest horsepower for her size. Clearly that translates into a fuel savings, but the bigger payoff comes in the layout. With smaller engines, the machinery space need not be as large as on a faster yacht of similar size. Combine that with the fuller sections in the midbody, and it produces bigger interior volume.

So what does this space equate to on the yacht? For starters, on the lower deck there are four big guest staterooms clustered around a circular stair and large foyer amidships. The crew's quarters are just as impressive, comprising five staterooms, each with a private head. Forward on the main deck is a palatial master suite.

Notable bridge-deck features in-clude a spacious office abaft the pilot-house and a big sky lounge opening onto an even more expansive alfresco area aft. To either side, retractable glass panels can shield guests from wind while they dine. Topping things off, literally, is a sundeck with a hot tub, sunbathing area, seating, and an enclosed gym under the radar arch.

When you get down to it, most yachts this size cruise in the low to midteens no matter what top speed they are capable of. So why sacrifice space for speed that's rarely used?

For more information on Burger Boat Company, including contact information, click here.

This article originally appeared in the October 2008 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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