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Timeless Charm Page 2

Timeless Charm

Part 2: CD Two is a comfortable and roomy yacht that easily accommodates 12 guests.

Story & Photos by Kim Kavin

   

Photo: Kim Kavin
 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Balearic Islands
• Part 2: Balearic Islands
• Part 3: Balearic Islands
• Balearic Islands Photo Gallery


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Leeming is a cheerful Brit who spent three years earning a great reputation in the charter industry aboard the owner’s previous yacht, CD One. He applied his sunny disposition to turning the new old girl around, with the owner’s full financial backing. “The first thing we did was cover the sofa in cream leather, and we painted the hull,” Leeming explains. “The engines were hand-rubbed down to the metal. The floors were sanded down to the cherry and restained. Flat-panel TVs and DVD players were added everywhere. We’ve spent a lot of money.”

It shows. When I first approached CD Two, her small windows and classic profile gave me an immediate sense of her age. Inside, though, I was pleasantly surprised. While she still has some work on the way, CD Two is a comfortable and roomy yacht that easily accommodates 12 guests. She winks personality, too, from a silver saloon bar to a boat-deck dining area that can be indoor or outdoor, depending on whether you open the curved-glass sliding doors.

Ours was the first post-refit charter—and a shakedown for CD Two’s brand-new crew as well. The first day was a challenge for them, but everyone soon settled into their routines and proved that service aboard will be good. The cuisine will be, too, with simple but tasty dishes such as veal marsala and dijon rack of lamb. With food, wine, and wind plentiful, we lounged around and let our minds do the wandering that our yacht could not. Conversations spun from the Abu Ghraib prison scandal in Iraq to the daily use of foot cream to the merits of creative pole dancing.

That last one, I think, made us all realize it was time to sober up and get off the boat, weather (or us) be damned. We looked inland for someplace that seemed interesting.

Ah, Valldemossa. The village that adopted Frederic Chopin as its favorite son is a classic composition unto itself. Getting there from Puerto Portals or Palma is an exercise in steep, winding, mountainside driving—not exactly the stimulation a carful of hangovers needs—but it is worth the trip. I’d been there once before during a charter, but only in the typical drop-in-for-lunch fashion. On this day I had oodles of time to explore.

Next page > Part 3: Homeowners dress their dwellings with intricately carved front doors that are works of art. > Page 1, 2, 3, 4

This article originally appeared in the October 2004 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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