Subscribe to our newsletter

Voyaging

Sweet and Suspenseful Surprises Page 2

Sweet and Suspenseful Surprises

Part 2: The 650-plus thread count sheets were hands-down the softest I’d ever slept in.

By Elizabeth A. Ginns - October 2003

   


 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Bahamas
• Part 2: Bahamas
• Part 3: Bahamas
• Drug Smuggling
• Bahamas Photo Gallery


 Related Resources
• Cruising/Chartering Index

 Elsewhere on the Web
• The Sacks Group
 

Yep, you read correctly: Leda is both a luxury yacht and a sportfisherman. Unfortunately, because of time constraints and the logistics of my trip, I wasn’t able to fish from Leda, but I did get some time aboard her 32-foot Intrepid tender. Still, the fighting chair is just one of many details that sets this yacht apart.

Flexibility is another. One of my chief goals in life is to achieve a state of complete and utter relaxation, and a megayacht charter, where anything and everything is done for you and you can be as active or inactive as you like, brought me as close to this as possible. Having said that, I also enjoy a get-your-hands-dirty fishing trip from time to time, and so I was gratified to learn that both extremes are possible aboard Leda. In fact I almost appreciated this as much as the lunch that awaited me when I retuned from my six-hour fishing expedition: Kobe beef medallions with lobster mayonnaise and new-potato salad accented with avocado, chipotle pepper, and Bermuda onion. Better yet, the filleting of my 25-pound mahi-mahi and cleaning of the fishing boat—two things I usually do myself— were taken care of by Leda’s attentive crew.

As for relaxation, Trinity not only improved Leda’s exterior, it updated her interior, too, which was designed by Dee Robinson. The yacht features new furnishings, paintings, and carpet. She’s also noticeably quiet. Lounging in her saloon, I could barely hear the 1,400-hp Caterpillar 3412s that give her a 15.5-knot cruise speed.

Her quiet extends to the accommodations area, where each stateroom door is soundproofed. My stateroom was so quiet, it was almost disappointing; I like falling asleep to the sound of water sloshing around under the boat and the gentle hum of the generators running. No wonder Trinity vice president Billy Smith, who was along on this cruise, told me, “Someone could be having a party in one stateroom and the person sleeping in the next stateroom wouldn’t hear anything.” I slept in one of the two guest staterooms, which I found somewhat small for two adults. (The master suite features a king-size bed and walk-through his and her head and a marble shower; the VIP stateroom features a walkaround queen with private head, so space for two would not be an issue in either of those rooms.) But the bed was perfectly comfortable, and the 650-plus thread count sheets were hands-down the softest I’d ever slept in. And thanks to Leda’s stewardess, who immediately put away anything I’d left lying around, the room was always immaculate, which helped counteract my space issue.

Next page > Part 3: The best thing about this crew is that they’re more than attentive > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5

This article originally appeared in the September 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

Related Features