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Nova Scotia Cruise Page 3

Shades of Gray, Patches of Green - Part 3
Shades of Gray, Patches of Green

Part 3: Through fog and rain

Written & Photographed by Capt. Ken Kreisler — August 2002

   


 More of this Feature

• Part 1: Nova Scotia
• Part 2: Nova Scotia
• Part 3: Nova Scotia
• Boat Photo Gallery


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We docked at the end of Montague Street, at Scotia Trawlers, where Bluenose I, launched in 1921 and the undefeated champion of the Grand Banks fishing schooner fleet and holder of the International Fishermen's Trophy, and Bluenose II, a replica constructed after the original sank in 1946, were built. In addition, reproductions of HMS Bounty and The Rose were built and launched here.

While walking the docks, I met Chris Webb, a salty Lunenburgian who runs a small harbor tour boat, and took him up on his offer to show us around the waterfront. "If'n you have the time this evening," Webb says, casting a wary eye skyward, "y'might want to take the candlelight town tour. Starts right here at the waterfront." It sounded great, but the weather deteriorated. Instead, on Webb's recommendation we dined at the Victorian Boscawen Inn on some of the best seafood any of us had had in a long time.

We spent the next morning walking the historic streets of Lunenburg and visiting the Fisheries Museum and art galleries and, when the sun finally came out for a time, enjoyed a dockside lunch at the Old Fish Factory Restaurant. We'd made arrangements through Scotia Trawlers to take on fuel, and once we were topped off, it was lines off to Chester. 

Located on Mahone Bay amid 365 islands and once home to Yankee privateers in colonial times, Chester is now a premier stop for cruisers. The town, situated on a peninsula, offers two harbors, the Front and Back, each lined with stately homes and expansive green lawns. For us it would be a walk around town and then a fine dinner at the landmark Captain's House Inn on Central Street, after which we sat in the town square and listened to a concert by the Chester Brass Band. A comfortable feather bed in a room at the historic Mecklenburgh Inn ended the day.

On our final day in Nova Scotia, we again picked our way through the fog down the coast to the Loyalist town of Shelburne at the head of Jordan Bay. The town dock could just be seen through a patchy fog, past fish traps and rafted-up trawler boats. As luck would have it, it was Loyalist Day, a celebration of Shelburne's British heritage involving dressing in traditional garb. Our dockmaster greeted us clad in 18th-century dress. "Are thee still loyal to the King?" he said. Not wanting to spend an afternoon in the stocks, we pledged our devotion to Georgie. We then spent the fog-shrouded day enjoying the festivities, visiting the cooperage, Dory Shop, and Shelburne County Museums, and just walking around the restored streets.

We left Shelburne at daybreak. As Mount Desert loomed closer, we caught a glimpse of what appeared to be a shark fin cutting the surface of the water but which turned out to be a sunfish. Docking in Southwest Harbor, its mooring field dotted with many Hinckley boats, my family quickly unloaded our gear and said goodbye to Roos and Wright.

Even through the fog and rain, we enjoyed our visit. The Talaria 44 proved to be a comfortable cruising boat, and Roos and Wright cheerful and easy traveling companions. I'd like to get to Halifax and perhaps up to Cape Breton. Maybe next time I visit, the weather will be a little more cooperative. But it really doesn't matter. Nova Scotia is the kind of place where your memories are the reward and an open invitation to return.

Next page > Nova Scotia Photo Gallery > Page 1, 2, 3, 4

This article originally appeared in the June 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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