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Uniesse 58 Page 2

EXCLUSIVE | Uniesse 58 By George L. Petrie — July 2006

Beginning Anew

New marketing, an updated layout, and an eye for detail should make this Italian builder a major player in the American market.

   
Forest Johnson
 More of this Feature

• Uniesse 58
• Uniesse 58 Part 2
• Uniesse 58 Specs
• Uniesse 58 Deck Plan
• Uniesse 58 Acceleration Curve
• Uniesse 58 Photo Gallery

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• Boat Test Index

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• Uniesse Marine U.S.A.

In the engine room, it’s even more apparent that Uniesse pays attention to even the smallest detail. For example, the cooling-water inlet tubing is wire-reinforced clear plastic, so it’s easy to check if there’s an obstruction in the line, not just at the strainer. And the chilled-water air conditioning lines passing through the engine room are double-insulated to minimize heat transfer. The engine room overhead is lined with fire-retardant acoustic insulation, to reduce sound and heat transfer to the saloon above. And thankfully all filters and dipsticks are located inboard of both engines, because I could barely scrunch my torso into the space between the engines and the outboard fuel tanks.

By contrast, there’s lots of room to stretch out on the flying bridge. Again, there’s a port-side helm, but with plenty of leg and hip room on the double bench helm seat, and acres of sunning and seating area behind. Refreshments are close at hand, thanks to the optional barbecue, ice maker, and wet bar module abaft the starboard-side guest seat.

After considering how comfortable the flying bridge was under the clear, sunny skies, I opted to do the sea trial from the upper helm station. At speed, the hull was responsive to the helm, banking nicely in gradual turns. In tight high-speed turns, however, she remained more upright; a bit disconcerting, but nothing to be alarmed about. Seas were barely a foot or two, hardly noticeable even at speeds of more than 30 knots. The weather was so nice, though, that we had plenty of company offshore and found several obliging sportfishermen turning up wakes three to four feet high. With the throttle wide open, the 58 shredded these with ease; no slamming, no spray, the hull seeming eager for more.

All too quickly, my time at the wheel was over, and we were making our way back to Uniesse’s dock on the New River, where Barca executed one of the slickest tight-quarters maneuvers I’ve seen in quite some time: a 180-degree turn (with help from the standard equipment bow thruster) and sideways slide into an impossibly tight slip with nary a foot to spare.

All told, I found the Uniesse 58 to be a quality product, rich in small details that might be easily overlooked but that will make ownership a rewarding experience. Without minimizing the import of Uniesse’s new marketing strategy, I have to think that Barca has an easy job. The 58 is a yacht that almost sells herself.

Uniesse Marine U.S.A. (954) 759-3424. www.uniesse.com.


Gear on Board >> Top-notch Hardware

Custom door handles and concealed door hinges are typical of the builder's attention to detail. All doors can be key-locked for privacy and security, and all door frames are gasketed to cut down on noise and vibration.



Next page > Uniesse 58: Specs > Page 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6

This article originally appeared in the August 2006 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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