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Tiara 5000 Open Page 2

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tiara 5000 Open — By Richard Thiel — July 2002

Single Identity
Part 2: Attention to detail
   
 


 
 




 

The helm, forward of the wet bar, is notable for its ample electronics space and signature Tiara tip-out console, the latter which makes it especially easy to install and service electronics. Almost everyone knows about this feature, but I was unaware of the molded-in spot on which a technician can sit and work. Talk about attention to detail.

Remember that analogy to the two-plus-two? Well, it's appropriate since the 5000 has two staterooms and two heads. Freed of the challenge of trying to squeeze in a third stateroom, Tiara designers were able to offer four big, comfortable spaces. The master is, of course, forward and offers port and starboard lockers, but the real stowage coup comes at the flip of a switch. The aft portion of the queen-size berth raises, and you have a big space with drawers and wire bins on the underside of the mattress platform. The en suite head with separate shower stall is to starboard. The second stateroom is aft and to starboard, with side-by-side berths flanking a hanging locker that can be replaced with a washer/dryer. There's another hanging locker forward, next to the guest/day head with shower, which has doors to both the stateroom and saloon. Both heads have ports for better light and ventilation.

Between these spaces is a large, comfortable, elegantly fitted-out saloon. A teak sole is standard, with teak and holly, solid cherry, or cherry and holly optional, and there's plenty of leather (in your choice of seven colors). Teak joinery is standard, with cherry as an option. As you'd expect on any luxury vehicle, all the good stuff is standard: 16,000-Btu air conditioning (a separate unit for the bridge deck is available), 22-inch flat-screen TV, and Bose AM/FM stereo with multidisc changer, and the entertainment gear can be hidden behind an elegant curved bulkhead via a crafty system of hinged panels. Lift the sole hatch, and there's a hot- and cold-water manifold that lets you cut the supply to one outlet without affecting the others. Another big dinette sits amidships to starboard, and aft of that a U-shape galley that again has all the amenities standard: Corian countertops, three-burner ceramic cooktop, microwave/convection oven, Sub-Zero refrigerator with two freezer drawers, coffee maker, and dedicated utensil and dish stowage.

Of course, any theoretical four-wheel-drive two-plus-two would have to be built tough--just in case one ever did want to venture off-road. Here again, the metaphor holds, as the 5000 is one of two Tiara hulls (the 5200 being the other) that is built with epoxy resin, quad-axial fabrics, balsa core, and vacuum bagging. The deck is also balsa-cored, but the stringers are laid up just like the hull. The engines are "toggle-mounted," a proprietary system that Tiara says ensures optimum alignment.

That hull, by the way, is unique to the Tiara line--it shares virtually nothing with the 5200. It does, however, exhibit somewhat bow-high running attitude. As you can see in the test results, running angles without tabs reached a maximum of 61⁄2 degrees, but this is something you shouldn't construe as a fault. I found tabs, about halfway deflected, not only vastly improved visibility during planing, but also improved speed, fuel efficiency, and handling. A bow-high attitude doesn't present any particular problem, as long as you remember to tab down, and it gives you more flexibility in a following sea, where you can retract the tabs and raise the bow. The 5000 also exhibits excellent throttle and wheel response and in the moderate chop of test day ran smoothly and dryly on all points.

I'm still not sure what precise handle I should hang on the 5000. Looking back over my notes, however, I'm thinking "one of a kind" has a nice ring to it.

Tiara Yachts Phone: (616) 392-7163. Fax: (616) 394-7466. www.tiarayachts.com.

 

This article originally appeared in the January 2003 issue of Power & Motoryacht magazine.

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